Daily Trust (Abuja)

24 June 2011

Nigeria: Citizens Prefer Military to Police at Elections - Survey

Nigerians seem more satisfied with the military than the police during elections, according to a survey released yesterday. The survey, titled Post Presidential Elections Survey, prepared for the Alliance for Credible Elections (ACE), and read by Innocent Chukwuma, a board member of the ACE and executive director of the Cleen foundation.

Chukwuma however told newsmen yesterday in Abuja that still Nigerians commended the security agencies during the polls.

He said "2012 respondents across Nigeria were interviewed face-to-face using English, Yoruba, Hausa, Ibo and Pidgin English for the survey."

The report which shows that 55 percent of respondent were very satisfied and 32 percent fairly satisfied with the performance of security forces in the April elections also show 43 percent of respondents satisfied with police ahead of 42 percent of the military.

However 28 percent were dissatisfied with the police compare to 11 percent of military, seven percent of Civil defence and two percent apiece of the Federal Road Safety Commission (FRSC) and the State Security Services (SSS).

The survey also show that 41 percent of the respondents says political thugs were mostly responsible for violence and intimidation, with 13 and 12 percents for fellow voters and party agents; while the politicians scored low seven percent for engaging in political violence.

Respondents with overwhelming 72 percent said they were very willing to participate in future elections but also concluded that trial and punishment of culprits is a major way of preventing electoral violence or intimidation in future election.

The report which shows that 56 percent of Muslims voted in the April elections ahead of 45 percent of Christians, also show that 51 percent Muslims ahead of 45 percent Christians considered the party which has the best candidate; and that 38 percent Christians compare to 32 percent Muslims were influenced by the policy of political parties.

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