The Citizen (Juba)

8 January 2012

South Sudan: SPLA Hails Obama Decision Allowing South Sudan to Buy Us Weapons

Juba — The United States President Barack Obama issued a memorandum on Friday notifying the Secretary of State and Congress that he is adding South Sudan to the list of countries eligible to buy weapons from the US.

US President Barack Obama speaks about the Defense Strategic Review, outlining Defense budget priorities and cuts, during a press briefing at the Pentagon in Washington, DC, January 5, 2012 according to (AFP).

"By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, including section 503(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and section 3(a)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act, as amended, I hereby find that the furnishing of defense articles and defense services to the Republic of South Sudan will strengthen the security of the United States and promote world peace," said the official text of Obama's decision.

The Sudan People's Liberation Army (SPLA) Spokesperson Col. Philip Aguer Panyang welcomed the decision made by the America government of allowing South Sudan to buy military equipment from USA.South Sudan after it was admitted to United Nations has international recognition to buy military equipment outside the country with an obligation to comply with international norms, and we applauded the good gesture expresses by the USA government, said Panyang.

South Sudan as independent nation should engage in signing military and security agreement with any nation pointing that the priority of the SPLA is to boost its defence capacity by providing modern weapons in order to meet any security challenge, said Panyang.

He appreciated the government efforts and urged that the SPLA will be ready to implement their part as the national army of the Republic of South Sudan.

He expressed concern that there is still tension along the border between South Sudan and Sudan adding that air bombardment still continues in Jau area in Unity State.But US officials said this move did not mean that Washington has imminent plans to sell arms to South Sudan.

"We have from the beginning, and even before we got to statehood, been open to conversations that they wanted to have with us about how they would secure their borders, defend themselves in the future," US State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said at a news briefing on Friday.

"Those conversations are ongoing. I am not aware that we've come to any conclusions about what they might need and what we might be able to provide," she said.South Sudan became an independent state last July following a referendum held a year ago in which Southerners decided almost unanimously that they wanted to secede from the Arab-Muslim dominated north.Despite Khartoum swiftly recognizing the new state on its borders, tensions have escalated dramatically ever since between the two countries. The two sides traded accusations on supporting rebel groups on the other side of the border.Late last year South Sudan accused Sudan of launching air raid inside its borders including one on a refugee camp. They repeated the allegation that Khartoum was bombing South Sudan at the start of this month.

The new state has no air defense systems to deter the Sudan Air Force (SAF) from carrying out bombardment missions inside its territories. This prompted many analysts to call on Washington to help South Sudan build its air defense capabilities which they say could make Khartoum think twice about going to war with Juba.

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