The New Dawn (Monrovia)

Liberia: A Woman's Revenge

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Evil and darkness have been friends apparently since the Creator declared, "Let there be light." But who doesn't realize that evil strides under the cover of darkness?

So it was during the reign of evil's companion that Evilee, the wife of the man, decided to carry out her plan. They called him Mr. Mawo. He and his family lived in a town called Huma. He and his wife had been together for twenty years and had done almost everything in common. He was the only woman he had, and he the only man she had, at least that's what almost everyone knew and said. They were so used to each other that she called him Wo-wo, and he called her Vilee.

Many in the town considered them not only great husband and wife but also the two best friends of the region. They joked as if they were two kids growing up. The townspeople hardly saw or heard them fuss or argue with each other. Many lovers wished they and their partners had such a relationship.

The two, Mr. Mawo and Evilee, had sworn solemnly that each would not harm the other or willfully allow evil to befall the other. It was an oath that further bound them together.

The presence of evil, however, usually causes oath to become meaningless, especially when darkness provides the excuse for that meaninglessness. And so it was that particular night.

Evilee moved surreptitiously through the dark and knocked her husband's window moderately, as if she didn't want to awake the other tenants. Evilee's familiar voice awoke Mr. Mawo and proceeded to the door to open.

"What happened, Vilee, that you've decided to come back under such a dangerously dark night?" remarked Mr. Mawo upon opening the door and seeing his wife who was anxious to enter the house.

"It's indeed a dangerously dark night, Wo-wo. And I wish conditions had not made it so," she responded.

They entered their room, chatted over a few topics and, before long, both were snoring - or at least it seemed. The man lay supinely, with his hands clasped behind his head.

Evilee gave a surreptitious look at her husband's body, which was faintly made visible by the quite deemed light of the lantern sitting on the table close to their bed. The two persons she was that night argued forcefully, one saying she should go right ahead, while the other was dissuading her. One had to win, of course.

Meanwhile, some rats ran here and there, shaking some household items in the process. Evilee got up and sat on the bed, the two persons in her still arguing. Sweat ran down her body. She had not done it before and couldn't understand why she should do, but she had to do it, anyway.

She raised her hand and was ready to hit, but the man, still sleeping, adjusted himself and lay on his side. She lowered her hand and sighed. But she was glad the man did not wake up.

Fortunately, the man readjusted himself, returning to his original supine position, exposing his neck and making the task more handleable. It was time to send the blow that would compensate for what was done to her.

She left the bed with her weapon still in her hand and stood over her husband. She bent directly over him and lifted her hand once more to strike, but just before descending her hand, a rushing bead of sweat ran over her left eye and was about to drop on the man. She quickly placed her crooked left hand under her head in order to receive the bead of sweat. She was successful. She swallowed spit and sighed. She then used her arm to wipe the rest of the sweat spread all over her face.

She didn't want anything to delay her any longer. The lateness of night would not be forever, and the task had to be performed. It was time to send the revengeful blow. And she hesitated no longer. Holding the knife with her two hands, she forcefully and revengefully struck the blow, with the knife penetrating the man's throat. Her legs shook under her confused body, but she had revenged.

She hurriedly and bemusedly did what she could do and escape the scene. Defying the lateness of night, she got outside and began the journey back to Runay, her mother-in-law's town where she had gone to be for a week. It was during her third night there that she traveled the ten-kilometer distance back to Human just to consummate her revenge.

She returned to Runay, quietly entered the room given her to sleep and lay on the bed. She wanted a new day to dawn instantly, but the night seemed longer. She lay on her stomach, on her back, on her side in continuously shifting motions. It was as if the bed comprised thorns that refused to give comfort to her body. Undoubtedly, she had succeeded in her desire to revenge, but it was now time for her mind to bear the burden. Conscience has a way of punishing its owner.

In the morning, the man's body was discovered in a pool of blood in his room in Huma. News was sent to his wife and his mother and others in Runay. The wife almost killed herself. She fell here and fell there and tore the clothes on her to show her grief for the loss of her husband.

Bystanders pitied her condition, with some saying, "ehya, poor woman! Some evil person has killed her husband for nothing."

"My husband! My sweet, sweet man! Wo-wo, where are you? Will you leave me like this? Why did you do this to me? I love you, my friend. Come back to me and the family. We miss you," screamed Evilee in her crying and wailing voice. Many cried with her in the process.

But why did she kill her best friend and husband and partner? Well, she did it because two years earlier, she had caught Mr. Mawo red-handed having sex with her younger sister one hot after in their bedroom, and she had sworn that she would revenge irredeemably on him.

Everyone revenges in one form or another, but it is said that when a woman revenges, it can be more lethal.

Seriously, my people, aren't these points to ponder?

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