23 November 2012

Ghana: The 2012 Edition of the Annual Meet-the-Press

press release

MR. CHAIRMAN, HON. MINISTER FOR INFORMATION

HON. DEPUTY MINISTER FOR INFORMATION

NANANOM, NIIMEI, NAAMEI

CHIEF DIRECTORS

DIRECTORS AND HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES

OUR FRIENDS FROM THE MEDIA

REGISTRARS OF THE VARIOUS HOUSES OF CHIEFS

DISTINGUISHED LADIES AND GENTLEMEN

1.0 INTRODUCTION

On behalf of the Ministry of Chieftaincy and Culture, I wish to express my sincere appreciation to all gathered here as we take our turn once again to outline the Ministry's performance and achievements for the period under review, i.e. 2011 to date, and what we intend to do in the future.

My presentation will give an insight into the importance of the sector and its contribution to the development of the country. This will afford the media and the general public a better understanding and appreciation of the sector and what support they could give to enhance the contribution of the sector for the growth of our beloved country.

1.1. MANDATE AND SECTOR AGENCIES

The Ministry was established in May 2006 to, among other functions, develop an effective interface between Government and Civil Society on matters relating to Chieftaincy and Culture for the promotion of peace, good governance, national cultural values and international partnership for the overall development of Ghana.

The agencies and institutions under the ministry include:

The National House of Chiefs, ten (10) Regional Houses of Chiefs, over two hundred (200) Traditional Councils, the National Commission on Culture (NCC), ten (10) Regional Centres for National Culture and One hundred and thirty eight (138) District Centres for National Culture; the National Theatre of Ghana, the Ghana Dance Company (Ghana Dance Ensemble), the National Drama Company (Abibigromma), the National Symphony Orchestra, Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Park, the Ghana Museums and Monuments Board, the W.E. B. Du Bois Centre for Pan African Culture, the National Folklore Board and the Bureau of Ghana Languages (BGL).

2.0. PERFORMANCE AND ACHIEVEMENTS

For the period under review, the Ministry, informed by its Five-year Strategic Plan 2011-2015, guided, supported and coordinated the implementation of the under listed programmes and projects by its sector agencies and institutions that contributed significantly to national development and good governance. It made appreciable strides in job creation, promoted culture as the basis for sustainable development and generally raised the level of cultural awareness among Ghanaians.

2.1. THE PROGRAMMES, PROJECTS AND ACTIVITIES UNDER TAKEN

2.1.1. ASCERTAINMENT AND CODIFICATION OF CUSTOMARY LAW ON LAND AND FAMILY IN GHANA

Article 272 of the 1992 Constitution mandates the National House of Chiefs to undertake the progressive study, interpretation, and codification of Customary Law with a view to evolving in appropriate cases a unified system of rules of Customary Law. It should be noted that, under chapter four of the Constitution the rules of customary law are recognised as part of the laws of Ghana.

However, what constitutes customary law in a particular community is not always clear. Different versions of the customary law compete for pre-eminence and the lack of certainty tends to generate land and chieftaincy disputes.

Hence, the initiation of the Ascertainment and Codification of Customary Law Project (ACLP). This is a joint project being executed in three phases by the National House of Chiefs and the Law Reform Commission with financial support from the GTZ for the first phase. During the period under review, the Ministry administratively supported the National House of Chiefs to successfully complete Phase One of the Project covering 20 traditional areas two (2) in each region. Phase one was on pilot basis and consisted of a desk study on customary land and family law, as well as field research. The reports on phase one have been circulated to all stakeholders.

The World Bank under the Land Administration Project II has made funding available for the second phase of the project which will test the preliminary findings and identification of variations in thirty (30) additional traditional areas, three (3) in each region.

The third and final phase will focus on validation, harmonization and codification processes.

The completion of the Project will considerably minimize the numerous chieftaincy, family and land disputes across the country. The favourable environment created thereafter will enhance Ghana's competitiveness for investment.

2.1.2. CODIFICATION OF LINES OF SUCCESSION APPLICABLE TO STOOLS/SKINS IN GHANA

As part of the processes of ensuring stability and security, for national development the Constitution has mandated the National House of Chiefs to compile Customary Laws and Lines of Succession applicable to each Stool or Skin in the country. The purpose of the project is to curtail unending litigation in chieftaincy affairs, to clarify procedures for the knowledge of stool/skin claimants, kingmakers and other stakeholders; to ensure peace and cohesion during periods of transition; and, to serve as an authentic documentation for instruction and reference for the codification of customary laws and succession.

In collaboration with the National Commission for Civic Education and with funding by the Government of Ghana, the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung and the United Nations Development Programme, the project which started in the year 2000, continued. To date research work has been done in about one hundred and thirteen (113) paramountcies and reports on them written as part of the enactment process. It needs mention that in 2010 Legislative Instruments on Declaration of Customary Law for eleven traditional area come into force.

Presently, the validated reports of fifteen (15) traditional areas have been converted into draft customary declaration laws for onward transmission to Parliament for passage into legislative instruments. The areas include Bechem and Bassa in the Brong Ahafo Region; Twifo Hemang and Breman Esikuma in the Central Region; Akyem Abuakwa in the Eastern Region; Mamprugu and Kpasenkpe in the Northern Region; Paga and Kayoro in the Upper East Region; Lawra, Lambussie and Wechiau in the Upper West Region; Likpe in the Volta Region and Ajomoro and Shama in the Western Region.

The completion of the project will tremendously reduce, if not totally, the numerous chieftaincy disputes that arise when a stool/skin becomes vacant. These conflicts have for the past years claimed lots of lives and destroyed properties worth millions of Ghana cedis. The unease that follows such conflicts tends to discourage both local and foreign investors from investing in such communities, whilst some companies operating in these areas fold up completely. Thus, worsening the unemployment situation.

2.1.3. ADJUDICATION OF CHIEFTAINCY CASES

The National House of Chiefs, made up of fifty (50) paramount chiefs from the ten (10) Regions among its responsibilities, performed judicial functions, having appellate and original jurisdictions in causes or matters affecting chieftaincy as provided for under Article 273 of the 1992 Constitution. In the same vein, Regional Houses of Chiefs have both appellate and original jurisdictions clearly defined in Article 274 of the Constitution.

In both the National and Regional Houses of Chiefs, these responsibilities are exercised through judicial committees assisted by lawyers.

The Judicial Committees of the National and Regional Houses of Chiefs settled thirty-three (33) out of a total three hundred and twenty cases during the period under review. The details are in the table shown below:

NO. HOUSE OF CHIEFS TOTAL NO. OF CASES CASES DISPOSED OFF CASES PENDING

1 National 78 3 75

2 Ashanti Region 35 9 26

3 Brong Ahafo Region 65 10 55

4 Central Region 34 3 31

5 Eastern Region 14 3 11

6 Greater Accra Region 28 1 27

7 Northern Region 10 - 10

8 Upper East Region 1 - 1

9 Upper West Region 11 1 10

10 Volta Region 32 - 32

11 Western Region 12 3 9

TOTAL 320 33 287

The number of cases resolved may not be impressive. This is one of the areas Nananom have their perennial challenge in terms of logistics and human resources (i.e. counsels) for the various Houses. Following representations made to government, the rate of sitting allowances paid to members of the Judicial Committees which form part of the Courts of Ghana of are being reviewed upwards.

2.1.4. PUBLICATION OF THE CHIEFTAINCY BULLETIN

The Chieftaincy Bulletin vol.1 no.3 covering chiefs whose names had been approved and entered into the National Register of Chiefs from September 2009 to December 2011 is ready for publication.

The Bulletin is the official mouthpiece of the House on matters affecting chieftaincy. It is also notice to the public concerning the performance of statutory duties by a chief in relation to Section 57 (5) of the Chieftaincy Act 2008 Act 759 which provides that and l quote "A person shall not be considered to be a chief for the performance of a function under this Act or any other enactment, unless that person has been registered for the performance of that function in the National Register of Chiefs and that person's name has been published in the Chieftaincy Bulletin". Unquote

2.1.5. CODE OF ETHICS FOR CHIEFS

With financial support from Konrad Adenauer Stiftung, the National House of Chiefs in a bid to produce a code of ethics for chiefs, undertook research work in 30 traditional areas for data collection, reviewed some judgments of the Superior Courts of Ghana relating to Chieftaincy and ethics and examined some unpublished research reports of the House relating to principal deposable offences identified in the codification of lines of succession project. The code reduces into writing within the modern and constitutional order, the great and ancient chieftaincy traditions of royal conduct and good behaviour and it serves to remind Chiefs, to among others, lead exemplary lives perform their duties as chiefs diligently to gain the respect of their peoples, and comply with the laws of the state especially those relating to chieftaincy as contained in the constitution, the Chieftaincy Act and any other law of the land. The Code of Ethics is ready for publication before the end of this year.

2.1.6. HIV/AIDS PROGRAMMES

The Ministry, with the support of United Nations Fund for Population Activities and United Nations Programme on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, has established Advocacy Committee on HIV/AIDS at the National House of Chiefs and appointed focal persons for each Regional House of Chiefs. During the year under review, the focal persons were given training in 'Result based Monitoring and Evaluation' to enable them adequately monitor and evaluate all HIV/AIDS mitigating programmes organized in the various regions to inform subsequent decision and direction by of the Advocacy Committee.

2.1.7. SEMINARS, CONFERENCES AND WORKSHOPS

The National House Chiefs participated actively in the following:

• National Constitution Review Conference on the theme "The Constitution, our Identity" from March 1st - 5th 2011 and made significant contributions, for instance, regarding the representation of the Chieftaincy institution in the local government administration and the representation of queen mothers at the Regional and the National Houses of Chiefs.

• Seminar on National Climate Change Policy Framework organized by the Ministry of Environment, Science and Technology.

• Seminar on Dissemination of the National HIV/AIDS Strategic plan 2011 - 2015 organized by the Ghana Aids Commission.

• Seminar on New Decentralization Policy Framework in Ghana organized by the Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development in conjunction with the Institute of Local Government Studies.

• Seminar on Factors required for the Establishment of Customary Land Secretariats and Customary Land Boundary Demarcation in Ghana organized by the Office of the Administrator of Stool/Skin Lands.

2.1.8. ESTABLISHMENT OF TRADITIONAL COUNCILS

Following the elevation of six stools to Paramount status in the Greater Accra Region, three Traditional Councils were established to facilitate the execution of the functions and responsibilities of the Paramountcies in the Nungua, Ngleshie Alata and Osu traditional areas.

2.2.0. PROMOTION OF NATIONAL CULTURE, SKILLS DEVELOPMENT AND JOB CREATION

2.2.1. NATIONAL COMMISSION ON CULTURE

The National Commission on Culture has the responsibility to maintain the unique cultural identity and values for the promotion of an integrated national culture as well as contributing to the overall economic development of the nation through its supervision of the implementation of project and programmes by the Centres for National Culture.

2.2.2. PROGRAMMES AND ACTIVITIES BY THE CENTRES FOR NATIONAL CULTURE WITH REGARD TO JOB CREATION AND EMPLOYMENT GENERATION IN THE REGIONS

At the regional level, the Centres are expected to implement and monitor Government policies relating to the development, promotion, preservation and appreciation of culture and arts in the region; identify, organize and mobilize the artistic resources of the region and develop the commercial potential of such resources; and pursue such activities aimed at contributing to the development of national culture and the arts.

During the period under review the Centres embarked on talent hunting and identification among the various artistic youth groups and associations, schools, colleges and out-of school youth and trained them to acquire the requisite skills and knowledge to be self employed or to earn income in the employment of others. The training covered the following domains:

2.2.2.1. ART AND CRAFTS

Out-of-school youth, students on practical training and interested persons were trained in traditional art and crafts within the pilot training units established under the Centres for National Culture. In the following:

(a) Smock Fabric Weaving and Designing

The pilot training units in the Northern, Upper East, and Upper West Regions trained about 150 persons in textile hand weaving and smock designing both formally and informally with improved cottage looms and moshie looms. The trainees undergo periods of instruction averaging 1 - 2 years as apprentices and finally pass out and establish their own guilds.

(b) Kente Weaving and Adinkra Printing

In Ashanti, Brong Ahafo and Eastern Regions about 300 out-of-school youth were trained in textile hand weaving and Kente designing both formally and informally with improved broad looms and cottage looms.

(c) Batik, Tie and Dye Production

The Community Youth Cultural Centre in Accra, Eastern Regional Centre and the Kumasi Cultural Centre trained over 150 out-of-school youth equipping them with skills to produce assorted batiks, tie and dye fabrics. Most of these youth went back and established their own local enterprises.

(d) Beads and Jewelry Production

The Eastern Regional Centre trained between 50 - 100 out-of-school youth in the Yilo and Manya Krobo districts with the required skills to produce assorted beads and jewelry from bauxite, broken bottles and plastics.

The Beads market has experienced an exponential growth due to the intervention of the Cultural Initiative Support Programme (CISP) funded by the European Union and which ended in 2011. An international exhibition and emporium was hosted in the Manya Krobo District where the various Beads Association showcased their works to the International Community.

The Eastern Regional Centre for National Culture has in conjunction with the New Juaben Municipal Assembly opened a Beads market which has provided a one stop shop for marketing of bead products.

(e) Wood Carving, Bamboo and Rattan Furniture Production

Over 400 out-of-school youth were supported with expert advice to acquire the mastery to produce assorted wood products ranging from stools, mortars, pestles, oware, drums, carved doors, panels etc. by the Kumasi Cultural Centre, the Arts Centre and other Regional Centres located within the forest zones. The graduands established their own local enterprises or joined other guilds of carvers.

(f) Painting and Sculpture

Over 100 graduates from the KNUST College of Art, University College of Education, Kumasi Polytechnic, Takoradi Polytechnic etc. did their industrial attachments with the Centres for National Culture to acquire on-the-job training to sharpen their skills and techniques in painting and sculpture.

(g) Traditional Pottery and Ceramics

The Arts Centre, Accra, and the Kumasi Cultural Centre supported over 300 out-of-school youth in the acquisition of traditional skills in pottery and ceramics. The Brong Ahafo Regional Centre likewise supported youth groups in and around the Tano River Basin in the production of earthenware bowls (apotoyowa).

(h) Straw Basket Production

The Regional Centres in the Northern, Upper East and Upper West regions trained over 150 out-of-school youth to acquire skills in straw basket production and other straw-related products.

(i) Marketing Avenues

Most of the Centres operate Art and Craft Galleries or Craft Shops for practitioners / producers to market their works on a 20% and 80% returns to the Centres and producers respectively on items sold.

2.2.2.2. PERFORMING ARTS

Most of the performing arts groups and associations in each region are affiliated to their respective Regional Centres. This makes them benefit from the Centres capacity building programmes and the use of their facilities for rehearsals and public performances. The zonal officers of the Centres visit their respective zones and rehearse with the groups and associations to perfect their skills and to update them on current government artistic programmes. Invariably, there are over 2,000 cultural music and dance groups in Ghana which regularly benefit from the professional advice from the cultural officers.

(a) Cultural Folkloric Music and Dance Group

Over 1,500 Adowa, Kete, Fontonfrom, Nmwomkro, Kpanlogo, Borborbor, Adaka, Kundum, Takai, Nagla, Sebiri etc. groups are ably supported by the centres through outreach programmes to perfect their skills and benefit from their stage crafts. Almost every village or town in Ghana can boast of one or more of these folkloric music and dance groups. These groups perform at public and private functions, durbars and festivals etc for a fee.

(b) Concert Parties and Drama groups

The centres support the various drama organizations in the regions with training programmes to improve upon their performance. The Kumasi, Cape Coast and Brong Ahafo Cultural Centres have been supporting various drama groups within their catchment areas with rehearsal and other training needs and equipment to keep them in business.

2.3. THE NATIONAL FOLKLORE BOARD

The National folklore Board was established to administer, monitor and register expression of folklore on behave of the Republic of Ghana. Ghana is fortunate to have an abundance of folklore materials being used variously by most of the hotels, restaurants, industries and banks throughout the country. The National Folklore Board continued to scout for unregistered users of the nation's folklore materials. Some institutions visited included banks, restaurants and hotels in the Accra Metropolis, and companies found to be using Ghana's folklore materials made to pay the appropriate royalties to Government. For the year under review the Board was able to realize amount of GH¢10,382.48 in royalties.

2.4.0. BUREAU OF GHANA LANGUAGES (BGL)

The Bureau of Ghana Languages is a focal point for the development, promotion, orthographic control and learning of Ghanaian languages.

2.4.1. REPRINTING OF BESTSELLERS

One of core functions of the Bureau is the publication of materials in eleven (11) Ghanaian languages namely: Akuapem Twi, Asante Twi, Dagaare, Dagbani, Dangme, Ewe, Ga, Gonja, Kasem, Mfantse, and Nzema. The Bureau is translating new reading materials recently approved by government for use in basic and second cycle schools, colleges, tertiary institutions and the general public. The Bureau, currently, supplies more than 60 percent of the text books for the West African Examination Council (WAEC) for use in both Junior and Senior High Schools. It also supplies about 40 percent of the textbooks at the primary level and also for the consumption of the general public.

During the year under review, the Bureau reprinted fifteen (15) titles of bestsellers, which were on high demand for use in educational institutions. Aside meeting the knowledge requirements of students and the general public, the sale of those books also enabled the Bureau to generate revenue for government.

2.4.2. ANTI-PIRACY CAMPAIGNS

In an attempt to curb piracy of its books, the Bureau undertook an anti-piracy campaign in Kumasi in the Ashanti Region. The exercise was to arrest and prosecute offenders as well as instill fear into would-be pirates. The Bureau intends to continue the exercise in the other Regions in order to ensure that it derives the maximum revenue due it from its work not only to be self-sustaining, but also to support developmental projects.

2.4.3. TRANSLATION OF FISHERIES REGULATIONS

In 2011, the Bureau translated the Fisheries Regulations, L.I. 1986 into five (5) Ghanaian Languages namely; Dangme, Ewe, Ga, Mfantse and Nzema. The intent was to afford the general public, especially the fishing communities, knowledge and understanding of the Fisheries Regulations to guide their operations and not to fall foul of the laws.

2.4.4. CELEBRATION OF INTERNATIONAL MOTHER TONGUE DAY (FEBRUARY 21, 2012)

The 2012 celebration of the Mother Tongue's Day on 21st February under the theme "Mother Tongue Instruction and Inclusive Education" was used by the Bureau to hammer home the importance of the use of Ghanaian languages as medium of instruction in the basic schools as well as the Bureau's preparedness to assist in that direction.

2.5.0. GHANA MUSEUMS AND MONUMENTS BOARD (GMMB)

The Ghana Museums and Monuments Board is the legal custodian of Ghana's material cultural heritage. Its mission is thus to acquire, protect, conserve and document the Nation's movable and immovable cultural heritage for posterity, for purposes of research and education of the public. The Board thus has responsibility both to maintain and develop the nation's forts and castles as well as the museums all over the country.

In this direction, the Board expended a lot of money on personnel training, public awareness and sensitization programmes. It also organized a number of publicity initiatives both locally and internationally. It is in this direction that the Board launched its website in the second quarter of 2012. The Board is thus working on realizing its dream of turning Ghana into the most preferred tourist site in Africa. The Board is set to be transformed into a sought-after institution in Ghana and to lead Ghana's tourism investment drive.

Presently the Board enjoys continuous increase in revenue generation from increased local and international patronage of the heritage sites. Internally generated income for the year 2011 was GHS 377,258.39 while that of 2012 as at October, 2012 was GHS 475,598.43, representing an increase of 26% over and above the 2011 income.

2.5.1. COMPLETION OF THE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

It is gratifying to mention that the Museum of Science and Technology building complex started in 1974 is currently in its final stage of completion with financial assistance from Government. The total cost for completing the project is GHc1, 687,500.00. The museum is to showcase scientific innovations, appropriate technology and supplement science education. Its completion will enable the Board to raise its revenue generation capacity to about 20%.

2.6.2. AFFILIATIONS TO INTERNATIONAL BODIES

The Board enjoys technical and financial assistance from UNESCO, West African Museum Programme and African World Heritage Fund. Membership of these bodies enable the Board to produce attractive and innovative programmes that earned it a high reputation in West Africa. It is in recognition of the international quality standards attained by the Board that during the year under review. It had the privilege of organizing z capacity building programme for the staff of its counterpart institution from Liberia.

2.5.3. PROTECTION OF CULTURAL AND HERITAGE SITES LISTED BY THE UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE CENTRE

In the wake of Ghana's oil find in the Western Region, the Board has successfully continued its sensitization campaign in some selected communities to educate the populace on the need to protect the heritage sites in the region, especially the Buffer Zones of our National and World Heritage Sites, to ensure that they remain on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

2.6.0. NATIONAL DRAMA COMPANY (ABIBIGROMMA)

In fulfilment of its mission, Abibigromma over the years made significant contributions in the promotion of the uniqueness of the cultural identity of Ghana as well as upholding our tradition and culture even in the face of serious infiltration of foreign cultures which is gradually gaining grounds in our development.

The Theatre for Development component of the company's activities has become a very useful tool for education. It has been used to enhance the understanding of second cycle students in some subjects notably English literature through the dramatization of the approved textbooks.

2.6.1. PUBLIC EDUCATION AND SENSITIZATION

Abibigromma has over the years communicated the polices and programmes of government and private institutions to the targeted groups and the general public through its Theatre for Development. An example during the period under review is the Public Education on the Biometric Registration commissioned by the Electoral Commission.

Others which are ongoing/re-enacted when required include:

• Public Education on establishment and essence of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) and NEPAD. (Client: NEPAD Secretariat).

• Launch of and Public education on the National Health Insurance Scheme. (Client: Ministry of Health).

• Public Education on Exploitation of Child labor in Commercial Sex and Fishing. (Client: International Needs, Ghana).

• FCUBE & Capitation Grant. (Client: Ministry of Education & Ghana Education Service).

2.7.0. THE NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

The mission of the National Symphony Orchestra is to develop and promote art music education and performance skill of Ghanaian artistes both locally and internationally. The Orchestra organizes music training programmes for schools and performs for clients for a fee. This enables the Orchestra to generate revenue to assist government developmental efforts.

2.7.1. INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION

In collaboration with the German Embassy, a German Conductor performed with the National Symphony Orchestra in August. A British - Canadian Conductor who saw the video footage of the performance on youtube has contacted the Director of the Orchestra to undertake a joint project to record non- western orchestras. The project is scheduled to start at the end of November this year.

2.7.2. FORMATION OF YOUTH ORCHESTRA

Plans are far advanced with financial and logistics support of the German Embassy towards the formation of a youth orchestra to ensure availability of talents for the continued existence of the National Symphony Orchestra.

2.8.0. KWAME NKRUMAH MEMORIAL PARK (KNMP)

The establishment of the Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Park is to promote and preserve the legacies of Dr. Kwame Nkrumah in relation to the history of the Republic of Ghana and to a large extent the history of Pan-Africanism. Since its creation the park has attracted significant numbers of domestic and foreign tourists and students thereby earning revenue for the country.

The Park in 2011 recorded a total of about 88,832 visitors, with an estimated number of 26,253 being non-Ghanaians. The Park was able to generate revenue to the tune of GHc181, 412.

An amount of GH¢ 80,000 was secured from the GETFUND to construct a glasshouse to conserve the official vehicle of Dr. Kwame Nkrumah. All these were done to ensure that the park remains an attraction to tourists, intellectuals, etc.

2.9.0. W. E. B. DU BOIS MEMORIAL CENTRE

2.9.1 BLACK HISTORY MONTH

February, designated as Black History Month, also known as African-American History Month, is observed annually in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom for remembrance of important people and events in the history of the African Diaspora.

In Ghana, the Dubois Centre organized a seminar or symposium on the theme "Pan Africanism Today; its relevance to the Youth" at which five (5) Pan African Clubs from selected second cycle institutions gave presentations. This was part of the celebration of the Black History Month and specifically to remember the illustrious son of Africa, Dr. W.E.B. Du Bois, the celebrated Pan African who left an indelible mark on Ghana's history. The idea was not only to inculcate nationalism, but also to conscientize the youth to continue his ideas and efforts to emancipate and unite blacks the world over.

2.9.2. WORLD DAY FOR CULTURAL DIVERSITY FOR DIALOGUE AND DEVELOPMENT

The National Commission on Culture and the W.E.B. Du Bois Memorial Centre for Pan African Culture in collaboration with UNESCO Ghana organized a public seminar and an art exhibition to mark the World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development on 23rd May, 2012 at the Conference Hall of the Centre. The topics presented were:

"Cultural Diversity and Intercultural Dialogue - an engine for development" by Dr. Kodjo Gavua, Archaeology Department University of Ghana, Legon.

"Globalization and its effects on the Creative Economy of Developing Nation" by Ms. Moji Okuribido (UNESCO Cluster Office)

"World Heritage Conventions" by Fred Amekudi of Ghana Museums and Monuments Board.

2.9.3. FASHION NIGHT

As part of African Union (AU) Day annual celebration, an African Fashion Night was organized by the Centre to:

• Unite Africans as one people,

• Promote African culture and costume, and

• Promote up-coming young designers.

3.0. PUBLIC - PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN THE CREATIVE INDUSTRY

3.1. COLLABORATION WITH CIVIL SOCIETY

The Ministry acknowledges the emerging creative economy as a leading component of economic growth, employment, trade and innovation and social cohesion in many countries. More importantly, it recognizes the potential of the creative industries to shape and reinforce Ghana's economic growth through job creation, income generation and export earnings. It is for this reason that the Ministry in its 5 year Strategic Plan, as a major policy, sought to enhance the visibility of the Creative Industry by developing and promoting public-private partnership in that area and strengthening the institutional support framework. In pursuance of above objective, the Ministry is working with civil society in the ten domains of the creative industry, namely Cultural Sites, Visual Arts, Traditional Cultural Expressions, Performing Arts, Music, Publishing, Audio Visuals, New Media, Design and Creative Services as well as other cultural practitioners involved in the overall development of culture nationally.

The Ministry collaborated with stakeholders including representatives of the ten domains, the Ghana Cultural Forum and the Foundation of the Creative Industries and under the guidance of the National Development Planning Commission developed the Creative Industry Sector Medium - Term Development Plan under the Ghana Shared Growth and Development Agenda (2010-2013) to inform initiatives and programmes that will strengthen the sector to actively engage in the world trade in creative goods and services, estimated by UNCTAD at $2.2 trillion in 2000 and continuing to grow at 5%. Programmes earmarked in sector plan play to be undertaken in 2013 include:

i. Promotion and protection of cultural art and intellectual property rights;

ii. Development of the sector (institutional strengthening).

iii. Development of human resource capacity, and

iv. Financing of the creative sector.

3.2. ESTABLISHMENT OF CULTURAL TRUST FUND TO SUPPORT THE CREATIVE INDUSTRY

In order to forge a holistic and integrated approach towards harnessing and strengthening the economic viability of our cultural institutions and resourcefulness of cultural practitioners, reviving traditional technologies, developing local markets and enhancing access to international markets, the Ministry is working closely with the Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning to activate the Cultural Trust Fund established in 2004. The Trust Fund is to harness resources for the promotion of the arts and culture for development.

The Fund is expected to redress the poor funding, over the years, of the sector that had inhibited the vast potential of the sector from contributing to the socio-economic development of the country.

It is noted that an amount of GH¢2million allocated in the 2012 budget to promote the Creative Arts Industry was released to the Musician Union of Ghana (MUSIGA) to, among others, identify the socio - economic contribution and the potential of the industry to the national economy through an impact assessment study. Some of the outcomes of the study will be a baseline indicators/data data collection on the sector and a four year Strategic Plan for the development of the Music sector.

14.0. Challenges

The Ministry and its sector agencies are saddled with several challenges. These challenges include:

• Inadequate budgetary allocation. Delays in the release of funds.

• Inadequacy of funding and logistics required to fund the statutory functions of Chiefs particularly, the Judicial functions. Low rates of sitting allowances paid to members of the Judicial Committees.

• The locations of Traditional Councils, which are a creation of statute, are within the palaces of chiefs. The situation exposes the staff to risks of attack on their lives during chieftaincy related conflicts. There is the need to provide offices for use as Traditional Councils.

• Resourcing the Traditional Councils, most of which have no computers, printers, photocopiers and other logistics to work with.

• Uncompleted regional theatres in all the ten regions. The Ministry has approached the Ministry of Education to explore the possibility of funding the completion of the theatres from GETFUND. The theatres, among other uses, serve as facilities for practical training in art and culture. My Ministry is enjoined by the constitution to collaborate with the Ministry of Education, for example, for the integration of culture into the fabric of national life through formal and informal education. As at December, 2011 a total estimated amount of GH¢6,159,673.02 was required to complete of the theatres.

• Inadequate personnel and weak human resource capacity particularly at i.e. Regional and District Centres of National Culture, Houses of Chiefs, and Traditional Councils. For example, four Regional Houses of Chiefs do not have counsels to assist the judicial committees.

• Inadequate official vehicles for the Ministry and sector agencies.

15.0 OUTLOOK FOR THE COMING YEAR (2013)

• The Ministry intends to continue with the second and third phases of the Ascertainment and Codification of Customary Law Project relating to Family and Land in Ghana. The third phase of the project which involves validation, harmonization and codification of customary laws pertaining to family and land when completed will greatly reduce land and chieftaincy disputes.

• The National and three Regional Houses of Chiefs will be rehabilitated to enable Nananom work in a more conducive and comfortable environment.

• The Ministry intends to complete the construction of the four Regional Theatres in the Brong Ahafo, Western, Ashanti and Eastern Regions which have reached various stages of completion. The theatres when completed will not only serve as places of entertainment and relaxation but will also serve as a major source of job creation in the Art and culture.

• The 2012 Edition of the National Festival of Arts and Culture, (NAFAC) was to have been held in Sunyani, Brong Ahafo Region, in October, 2012 under the theme: "NAFAC - HARNESSING OUR DIVERSE HUMAN CAPITAL AND TECHNOLOGY TO ADD VALUE TO THE CREATIVE INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY FOR SUSTAIBALE DEVELOPMENT TOWARDS A BETTER GHANA AGENDA". However, it had to be postponed for reasons beyond the Ministry's control. It will be held in November, 2013. The festival, held biennially, is a major cultural event which promotes social cohesion, fosters unity and focuses on national development.

• The Ministry intends to recruit and train about 40 Regional Registrars to serve in the Traditional Councils, recruit four lawyers, as well as build the capacity of existing staff.

• The Ministry intends to work closely with cultural practitioners and stakeholders in the Creative Industry to implement the Creative Industry Sector Medium - Term Development Plan; high on the agenda being the creation of the Cultural Trust Fund; the establishment of a Council for the Creative Industry, research into and data collection on the socio-economic contribution and potential of the industry to facilitate decision making, particularly regarding budgetary allocation. This collaboration will be done with the view to developing and strengthening the country's creative economy in ways that will enable Ghana to actively engage in the lucrative trade in creative goods and services.

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, l wish to state that the Ministry is determined to explore innovative ways of funding its activities. Infact, the National House of Chiefs has established an endowment fund to support its activities. His Excellency the late President John Evans Atta Mills gave the fund an amount GH¢500,000.

The Ministry will continue to collaborate with Ministries like Local Government and Rural Development; Trade and Industry; Tourism; Environment, Science and Technology; Education; Employment and Social Welfare and other non-governmental stakeholders to implement its Strategic Plan to ensure that culture lives up to the expectation of being the bedrock of development in this country like elsewhere. The Ministry and the Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development have submitted a joint cabinet memorandum seeking approval for proposed permanent arrangement for the Regional Coordinating Councils and the various Metropolitan, Municipal and District Assemblies to support the traditional councils to enable Nananom to execute their functions for the promotion of good governance and overall national development.

The Ministry appeals to all stakeholders, organizations, individuals, and the public at large for the necessary support and co-operation.

On this note, Mr. Chairman, I wish to express my sincere gratitude for the opportunity given to the Ministry to inform the good people of Ghana the nation, through the press, of its activities in the period under review.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION AND GOD BLESS US ALL.

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