The Namibian (Windhoek)

Namibia: The Art That Was

THEY say art appreciation is entirely subjective and after living through the artistic action-r play that was 2011, I was fully expecting to be subjected to cardboard prints en masse, wildlife photography by the truckload and enough paint- ings of landscapes to send me further around the bend.

However, with pencils sharper than ever and with imaginations to match, this year's offering from assorted visual artists across the country has been both miscellaneous and marvellous.

Like anything working against the status quo, 2012 began with spray paint. Not with intentionally jarring graffiti but with a quaint and clean offering from Margit Calegari whose spray paint technique was displayed at the Goethe-Zentrum in february.

Also exhibiting in the month of love was veteran painter, Paul Kiddo whose landscapes and skies over rural scenes were exhibited at the fran- co-Namibian Cultural Centre (fNCC) and earned much acclaim for the aged artist.

Similar in theme if not longevity was 'Life Sliding', by Aurélie Zannier-Wahengo that depicted bustling rural landscapes on creative seg- mented canvases.

Other local ladies who made an inspired impression this year were Susan Mitchinson, esther fellner, Helga Stein- bruck, Anita Heystek and Carina van der Merwe whose paintings were all wonderfully picturesque with a tendency towards perfection.

Less perfect though no less intriguing, was foibe Amund- aba whose whimsical 'Inviting Conversation', stood out in an otherwise dismal Cota Gradu- ateexhibition held in february. Herball-of-string-come-to-life aesthetic was noted with relief and this technique was enough to land her first exhibition at the Blue frog restaurant titled A Line of Stories'. Not one to enjoy artistic suc-

cess without giving back to the industry, Amundaba launched 'the Clay festival' in May. the festival was a celebration of Namibia's abundance of clay and invited people from all walks of life and work to make sculptures at the Camel Stable Art Studio.

Also exhibiting at the Blue frog restaurant was Pieter Basson's 'Going Nowhere', which was a quirky, Picas- so-esque offering presented in September.

In terms of stunning creativ- ity and innovation, artists erik Schnack and Papa Shikongeni were the main men.

In May Schnack confused and delighted audiences with 'Scramble', a fantastic fusion of found materials such as tin cans, bicycle chains, gears and sprockets and designed as a manifestation of his meander- ings regarding male migrant labourers as previously housed at the KCAC.

Much like Amundaba, Schnack went on to share his skills and creativity by acting as a warden of 'Speechbubble', Namibia's first comic book, along with the film society's Oshosheni Hiveluah.

Also innovative in May was Papa Shikongeni who climbed out of his cardboard box to present 'Art is U', at the House of Art at Maerua Mall. Swopping prints for zips, Shikongeni made pieces entirely out of multicoloured zips to present a new technique to Namibia.

Photographically speaking, Namibia enjoyed exhibitions by Kari Smaage, Leonie Marinovic and Kristin Capp. Capp ended the year as the first lecturer of photography at Unam and the fulbright scholar presented her first look at our country as filtered through her lens in 'Horse Latitudes', in May.

exhibitions by Smaage and Marinovic were didactic in nature and dealt with good health in the elderly and HIV respectively. One unfortunate event for

the photographic community was a lack of the Month of Photography whose nine gallery exhibitions and month of events debuted to rave re- views in 2011. Underfunded and generally agreed to be a bi-annual affair, photographers and patrons can look forward to its return in 2013.

from photography to Pho- toshop, artists Sigi Kolbe and Don Stevenson introduced Namibian artists to digital art with a lecture in August. though the class was horri- bly under-attended, the pair captivated the audience with a range of possibilities and opportunities to enhance and inspire creativity in the new medium.

When it comes to sculpture, Alpheus Mvula was the name in lights. Merging Namibia's love for cattle with his love for chipping away at a block of marble, Mvula presented 'Oongombe', which was the first exhibition held on the Hilton Hotel's mezzanine floor.

Unlike in 2011, the 2012 students were a force to be reckoned with and in addi- tion to Unam and Cota they included Barbara Bohlke's art students who painted flowers for charity in the LifeLine/ ChildLine benefit 'Blooms for Lifeline'.

In terms of tertiary insti- tutions, Unam and Cota both presented imaginative and inspired final year works and as such 2013 looks promising in terms of new artistic recruits.

However, an element lack- ing in the student visual arts is any inclusion of the status quo and society in general.

While the students are happy to paint scenarios sprung from their mind, there is little to no comment on the world they are living in which is filled with facebook, 'pas- sion-killings', unemployment, binge-drinking, emphasis on appearance and all the other trappings of the 21st century in Namibia.

Perhaps students can ad- dress some of these things by entering Land Matters in Art which invites artists to show their negative, positive, ambivalent or indeed any emotions about land through art actions such as painting, printing, drawing, photogra- phy, sculpture, print making, mixed media, video, textile, ceramic, installation, land art or any other visual art form by January 21 to 25 2013.

Anothersection thatseems to be lagging is textiles which, just like last year, offered a few notable pieces but was generally dull and unexciting. Perhaps Batik in 'Giraffe's' tom Kenesi who is a pioneer in the batik flour technique should be called in to give a few pointers.

though the //Ae/Gams Arts and Cultural festival was as dismal as ever, one great inclusion was 'remembering Old Location', which was a tent set up full of items and photos from the time replete with two women who lived through the resettlement.

No doubt an engaging and interactive exhibit, one surely hopes we will see such inventive exhibitions from the NAGN that has recently welcomed Hercules Viljoen as its new director.

All smiles and having successfully hosted the an- nual women's exhibition and spoken to the press about his plans, Viljoen is tasked with providing a home for all these wonderful artists who are painting, sculpting and drawing their way towards a tremendous 2013.THEY say art appreciation is entirely subjective and after living through the artistic action-r play that was 2011, I was fully expecting to be subjected to cardboard prints en masse, wildlife photography by the truckload and enough paint- ings of landscapes to send me further around the bend.

However, with pencils sharper than ever and with imaginations to match, this year's offering from assorted visual artists across the country has been both miscellaneous and marvellous.

Like anything working against the status quo, 2012 began with spray paint. Not with intentionally jarring graffiti but with a quaint and clean offering from Margit Calegari whose spray paint technique was displayed at the Goethe-Zentrum in february.

Also exhibiting in the month of love was veteran painter, Paul Kiddo whose landscapes and skies over rural scenes were exhibited at the fran- co-Namibian Cultural Centre (fNCC) and earned much acclaim for the aged artist.

Similar in theme if not longevity was 'Life Sliding', by Aurélie Zannier-Wahengo that depicted bustling rural landscapes on creative seg- mented canvases.

Other local ladies who made an inspired impression this year were Susan Mitchinson, esther fellner, Helga Stein- bruck, Anita Heystek and Carina van der Merwe whose paintings were all wonderfully picturesque with a tendency towards perfection.

Less perfect though no less intriguing, was foibe Amund- aba whose whimsical 'Inviting Conversation', stood out in an otherwise dismal Cota Gradu- ateexhibition held in february. Herball-of-string-come-to-life aesthetic was noted with relief and this technique was enough to land her first exhibition at the Blue frog restaurant titled A Line of Stories'. Not one to enjoy artistic suc-

cess without giving back to the industry, Amundaba launched 'the Clay festival' in May. the festival was a celebration of Namibia's abundance of clay and invited people from all walks of life and work to make sculptures at the Camel Stable Art Studio.

Also exhibiting at the Blue frog restaurant was Pieter Basson's 'Going Nowhere', which was a quirky, Picas- so-esque offering presented in September.

In terms of stunning creativ- ity and innovation, artists erik Schnack and Papa Shikongeni were the main men.

In May Schnack confused and delighted audiences with 'Scramble', a fantastic fusion of found materials such as tin cans, bicycle chains, gears and sprockets and designed as a manifestation of his meander- ings regarding male migrant labourers as previously housed at the KCAC.

Much like Amundaba, Schnack went on to share his skills and creativity by acting as a warden of 'Speechbubble', Namibia's first comic book, along with the film society's Oshosheni Hiveluah.

Also innovative in May was Papa Shikongeni who climbed out of his cardboard box to present 'Art is U', at the House of Art at Maerua Mall. Swopping prints for zips, Shikongeni made pieces entirely out of multicoloured zips to present a new technique to Namibia.

Photographically speaking, Namibia enjoyed exhibitions by Kari Smaage, Leonie Marinovic and Kristin Capp. Capp ended the year as the first lecturer of photography at Unam and the fulbright scholar presented her first look at our country as filtered through her lens in 'Horse Latitudes', in May.

exhibitions by Smaage and Marinovic were didactic in nature and dealt with good health in the elderly and HIV respectively. One unfortunate event for the photographic community was a lack of the Month of Photography whose nine gallery exhibitions and month of events debuted to rave re- views in 2011. Underfunded and generally agreed to be a bi-annual affair, photographers and patrons can look forward to its return in 2013.

from photography to Pho- toshop, artists Sigi Kolbe and Don Stevenson introduced Namibian artists to digital art with a lecture in August. though the class was horri- bly under-attended, the pair captivated the audience with a range of possibilities and opportunities to enhance and inspire creativity in the new medium.

When it comes to sculpture, Alpheus Mvula was the name in lights. Merging Namibia's love for cattle with his love for chipping away at a block of marble, Mvula presented 'Oongombe', which was the first exhibition held on the Hilton Hotel's mezzanine floor.

Unlike in 2011, the 2012 students were a force to be reckoned with and in addi- tion to Unam and Cota they included Barbara Bohlke's art students who painted flowers for charity in the LifeLine/ ChildLine benefit 'Blooms for Lifeline'.

In terms of tertiary insti- tutions, Unam and Cota both presented imaginative and inspired final year works and as such 2013 looks promising in terms of new artistic recruits.

However, an element lack- ing in the student visual arts is any inclusion of the status quo and society in general.

While the students are happy to paint scenarios sprung from their mind, there is little to no comment on the world they are living in which is filled with facebook, 'pas- sion-killings', unemployment, binge-drinking, emphasis on appearance and all the other trappings of the 21st century in Namibia.

Perhaps students can ad- dress some of these things by entering Land Matters in Art which invites artists to show their negative, positive, ambivalent or indeed any emotions about land through art actions such as painting, printing, drawing, photogra- phy, sculpture, print making, mixed media, video, textile, ceramic, installation, land art or any other visual art form by January 21 to 25 2013.

Anothersection thatseems to be lagging is textiles which, just like last year, offered a few notable pieces but was generally dull and unexciting. Perhaps Batik in 'Giraffe's' tom Kenesi who is a pioneer in the batik flour technique should be called in to give a few pointers.

though the //Ae/Gams Arts and Cultural festival was as dismal as ever, one great inclusion was 'remembering Old Location', which was a tent set up full of items and photos from the time replete with two women who lived through the resettlement.

No doubt an engaging and interactive exhibit, one surely hopes we will see such inventive exhibitions from the NAGN that has recently welcomed Hercules Viljoen as its new director.

All smiles and having successfully hosted the an- nual women's exhibition and spoken to the press about his plans, Viljoen is tasked with providing a home for all these wonderful artists who are painting, sculpting and drawing their way towards a tremendous 2013.THEY say art appreciation is entirely subjective and after living through the artistic action-r play that was 2011, I was fully expecting to be subjected to cardboard prints en masse, wildlife photography by the truckload and enough paint- ings of landscapes to send me further around the bend.

However, with pencils sharper than ever and with imaginations to match, this year's offering from assorted visual artists across the country has been both miscellaneous and marvellous.

Like anything working against the status quo, 2012 began with spray paint. Not with intentionally jarring graffiti but with a quaint and clean offering from Margit Calegari whose spray paint technique was displayed at the Goethe-Zentrum in february.

Also exhibiting in the month of love was veteran painter, Paul Kiddo whose landscapes and skies over rural scenes were exhibited at the fran- co-Namibian Cultural Centre (fNCC) and earned much acclaim for the aged artist.

Similar in theme if not longevity was 'Life Sliding', by Aurélie Zannier-Wahengo that depicted bustling rural landscapes on creative seg- mented canvases.

Other local ladies who made an inspired impression this year were Susan Mitchinson, esther fellner, Helga Stein- bruck, Anita Heystek and Carina van der Merwe whose paintings were all wonderfully picturesque with a tendency towards perfection.

Less perfect though no less intriguing, was foibe Amund- aba whose whimsical 'Inviting Conversation', stood out in an otherwise dismal Cota Gradu- ateexhibition held in february. Herball-of-string-come-to-life aesthetic was noted with relief and this technique was enough to land her first exhibition at the Blue frog restaurant titled A Line of Stories'. Not one to enjoy artistic suc-

cess without giving back to the industry, Amundaba launched 'the Clay festival' in May. the festival was a celebration of Namibia's abundance of clay and invited people from all walks of life and work to make sculptures at the Camel Stable Art Studio.

Also exhibiting at the Blue frog restaurant was Pieter Basson's 'Going Nowhere', which was a quirky, Picas- so-esque offering presented in September.

In terms of stunning creativ- ity and innovation, artists erik Schnack and Papa Shikongeni were the main men.

In May Schnack confused and delighted audiences with 'Scramble', a fantastic fusion of found materials such as tin cans, bicycle chains, gears and sprockets and designed as a manifestation of his meander- ings regarding male migrant labourers as previously housed at the KCAC.

Much like Amundaba, Schnack went on to share his skills and creativity by acting as a warden of 'Speechbubble', Namibia's first comic book, along with the film society's Oshosheni Hiveluah.

Also innovative in May was Papa Shikongeni who climbed out of his cardboard box to present 'Art is U', at the House of Art at Maerua Mall. Swopping prints for zips, Shikongeni made pieces entirely out of multicoloured zips to present a new technique to Namibia.

Photographically speaking, Namibia enjoyed exhibitions by Kari Smaage, Leonie Marinovic and Kristin Capp. Capp ended the year as the first lecturer of photography at Unam and the fulbright scholar presented her first look at our country as filtered through her lens in 'Horse Latitudes', in May.

exhibitions by Smaage and Marinovic were didactic in nature and dealt with good health in the elderly and HIV respectively. One unfortunate event for the photographic community was a lack of the Month of Photography whose nine gallery exhibitions and month of events debuted to rave re- views in 2011. Underfunded and generally agreed to be a bi-annual affair, photographers and patrons can look forward to its return in 2013.

from photography to Pho- toshop, artists Sigi Kolbe and Don Stevenson introduced Namibian artists to digital art with a lecture in August. though the class was horri- bly under-attended, the pair captivated the audience with a range of possibilities and opportunities to enhance and inspire creativity in the new medium.

When it comes to sculpture, Alpheus Mvula was the name in lights. Merging Namibia's love for cattle with his love for chipping away at a block of marble, Mvula presented 'Oongombe', which was the first exhibition held on the Hilton Hotel's mezzanine floor.

Unlike in 2011, the 2012 students were a force to be reckoned with and in addi- tion to Unam and Cota they included Barbara Bohlke's art students who painted flowers for charity in the LifeLine/ ChildLine benefit 'Blooms for Lifeline'.

In terms of tertiary insti- tutions, Unam and Cota both presented imaginative and inspired final year works and as such 2013 looks promising in terms of new artistic recruits.

However, an element lack- ing in the student visual arts is any inclusion of the status quo and society in general.

While the students are happy to paint scenarios sprung from their mind, there is little to no comment on the world they are living in which is filled with facebook

THEY say art appreciation is entirely subjective and after living through the artistic action-r play that was 2011, I was fully expecting to be subjected to cardboard prints en masse, wildlife photography by the truckload and enough paint- ings of landscapes to send me further around the bend.

However, with pencils sharper than ever and with imaginations to match, this year's offering from assorted visual artists across the country has been both miscellaneous and marvellous.

Like anything working against the status quo, 2012 began with spray paint. Not with intentionally jarring graffiti but with a quaint and clean offering from Margit Calegari whose spray paint technique was displayed at the Goethe-Zentrum in february.

Also exhibiting in the month of love was veteran painter, Paul Kiddo whose landscapes and skies over rural scenes were exhibited at the fran- co-Namibian Cultural Centre (fNCC) and earned much acclaim for the aged artist.

Similar in theme if not longevity was 'Life Sliding', by Aurélie Zannier-Wahengo that depicted bustling rural landscapes on creative seg- mented canvases.

Other local ladies who made an inspired impression this year were Susan Mitchinson, esther fellner, Helga Stein- bruck, Anita Heystek and Carina van der Merwe whose paintings were all wonderfully picturesque with a tendency towards perfection.

Less perfect though no less intriguing, was foibe Amund- aba whose whimsical 'Inviting Conversation', stood out in an otherwise dismal Cota Gradu- ateexhibition held in february. Herball-of-string-come-to-life aesthetic was noted with relief and this technique was enough to land her first exhibition at the Blue frog restaurant titled A Line of Stories'. Not one to enjoy artistic suc-

cess without giving back to the industry, Amundaba launched 'the Clay festival' in May. the festival was a celebration of Namibia's abundance of clay and invited people from all walks of life and work to make sculptures at the Camel Stable Art Studio.

Also exhibiting at the Blue frog restaurant was Pieter Basson's 'Going Nowhere', which was a quirky, Picas- so-esque offering presented in September.

In terms of stunning creativ- ity and innovation, artists erik Schnack and Papa Shikongeni were the main men.

In May Schnack confused and delighted audiences with 'Scramble', a fantastic fusion of found materials such as tin cans, bicycle chains, gears and sprockets and designed as a manifestation of his meander- ings regarding male migrant labourers as previously housed at the KCAC.

Much like Amundaba, Schnack went on to share his skills and creativity by acting as a warden of 'Speechbubble', Namibia's first comic book, along with the film society's Oshosheni Hiveluah.

Also innovative in May was Papa Shikongeni who climbed out of his cardboard box to present 'Art is U', at the House of Art at Maerua Mall. Swopping prints for zips, Shikongeni made pieces entirely out of multicoloured zips to present a new technique to Namibia.

Photographically speaking, Namibia enjoyed exhibitions by Kari Smaage, Leonie Marinovic and Kristin Capp. Capp ended the year as the first lecturer of photography at Unam and the fulbright scholar presented her first look at our country as filtered through her lens in 'Horse Latitudes', in May.

exhibitions by Smaage and Marinovic were didactic in nature and dealt with good health in the elderly and HIV respectively. One unfortunate event for

the photographic community was a lack of the Month of Photography whose nine gallery exhibitions and month of events debuted to rave re- views in 2011. Underfunded and generally agreed to be a bi-annual affair, photographers and patrons can look forward to its return in 2013.

from photography to Pho- toshop, artists Sigi Kolbe and Don Stevenson introduced Namibian artists to digital art with a lecture in August. though the class was horri- bly under-attended, the pair captivated the audience with a range of possibilities and opportunities to enhance and inspire creativity in the new medium.

When it comes to sculpture, Alpheus Mvula was the name in lights. Merging Namibia's love for cattle with his love for chipping away at a block of marble, Mvula presented 'Oongombe', which was the first exhibition held on the Hilton Hotel's mezzanine floor.

Unlike in 2011, the 2012 students were a force to be reckoned with and in addi- tion to Unam and Cota they included Barbara Bohlke's art students who painted flowers for charity in the LifeLine/ ChildLine benefit 'Blooms for Lifeline'.

In terms of tertiary insti- tutions, Unam and Cota both presented imaginative and inspired final year works and as such 2013 looks promising in terms of new artistic recruits.

However, an element lack- ing in the student visual arts is any inclusion of the status quo and society in general.

While the students are happy to paint scenarios sprung from their mind, there is little to no comment on the world they are living in which is filled with facebook, 'pas- sion-killings', unemployment, binge-drinking, emphasis on appearance and all the other trappings of the 21st century in Namibia.

Perhaps students can ad- dress some of these things by entering Land Matters in Art which invites artists to show their negative, positive, ambivalent or indeed any emotions about land through art actions such as painting, printing, drawing, photogra- phy, sculpture, print making, mixed media, video, textile, ceramic, installation, land art or any other visual art form by January 21 to 25 2013.

Anothersection thatseems to be lagging is textiles which, just like last year, offered a few notable pieces but was generally dull and unexciting. Perhaps Batik in 'Giraffe's' tom Kenesi who is a pioneer in the batik flour technique should be called in to give a few pointers.

though the //Ae/Gams Arts and Cultural festival was as dismal as ever, one great inclusion was 'remembering Old Location', which was a tent set up full of items and photos from the time replete with two women who lived through the resettlement.

No doubt an engaging and interactive exhibit, one surely hopes we will see such inventive exhibitions from the NAGN that has recently welcomed Hercules Viljoen as its new director.

All smiles and having successfully hosted the an- nual women's exhibition and spoken to the press about his plans, Viljoen is tasked with providing a home for all these wonderful artists who are painting, sculpting and drawing their way towards a tremendous 2013.THEY say art appreciation is entirely subjective and after living through the artistic action-r play that was 2011, I was fully expecting to be subjected to cardboard prints en masse, wildlife photography by the truckload and enough paint- ings of landscapes to send me further around the bend.

However, with pencils sharper than ever and with imaginations to match, this year's offering from assorted visual artists across the country has been both miscellaneous and marvellous.

Like anything working against the status quo, 2012 began with spray paint. Not with intentionally jarring graffiti but with a quaint and clean offering from Margit Calegari whose spray paint technique was displayed at the Goethe-Zentrum in february.

Also exhibiting in the month of love was veteran painter, Paul Kiddo whose landscapes and skies over rural scenes were exhibited at the fran- co-Namibian Cultural Centre (fNCC) and earned much acclaim for the aged artist.

Similar in theme if not longevity was 'Life Sliding', by Aurélie Zannier-Wahengo that depicted bustling rural landscapes on creative seg- mented canvases.

Other local ladies who made an inspired impression this year were Susan Mitchinson, esther fellner, Helga Stein- bruck, Anita Heystek and Carina van der Merwe whose paintings were all wonderfully picturesque with a tendency towards perfection.

Less perfect though no less intriguing, was foibe Amund- aba whose whimsical 'Inviting Conversation', stood out in an otherwise dismal Cota Gradu- ateexhibition held in february. Herball-of-string-come-to-life aesthetic was noted with relief and this technique was enough to land her first exhibition at the Blue frog restaurant titled A Line of Stories'. Not one to enjoy artistic suc-

cess without giving back to the industry, Amundaba launched 'the Clay festival' in May. the festival was a celebration of Namibia's abundance of clay and invited people from all walks of life and work to make sculptures at the Camel Stable Art Studio.

Also exhibiting at the Blue frog restaurant was Pieter Basson's 'Going Nowhere', which was a quirky, Picas- so-esque offering presented in September.

In terms of stunning creativ- ity and innovation, artists erik Schnack and Papa Shikongeni were the main men.

In May Schnack confused and delighted audiences with 'Scramble', a fantastic fusion of found materials such as tin cans, bicycle chains, gears and sprockets and designed as a manifestation of his meander- ings regarding male migrant labourers as previously housed at the KCAC.

Much like Amundaba, Schnack went on to share his skills and creativity by acting as a warden of 'Speechbubble', Namibia's first comic book, along with the film society's Oshosheni Hiveluah.

Also innovative in May was Papa Shikongeni who climbed out of his cardboard box to present 'Art is U', at the House of Art at Maerua Mall. Swopping prints for zips, Shikongeni made pieces entirely out of multicoloured zips to present a new technique to Namibia.

Photographically speaking, Namibia enjoyed exhibitions by Kari Smaage, Leonie Marinovic and Kristin Capp. Capp ended the year as the first lecturer of photography at Unam and the fulbright scholar presented her first look at our country as filtered through her lens in 'Horse Latitudes', in May.

exhibitions by Smaage and Marinovic were didactic in nature and dealt with good health in the elderly and HIV respectively. One unfortunate event for

the photographic community was a lack of the Month of Photography whose nine gallery exhibitions and month of events debuted to rave re- views in 2011. Underfunded and generally agreed to be a bi-annual affair, photographers and patrons can look forward to its return in 2013.

from photography to Pho- toshop, artists Sigi Kolbe and Don Stevenson introduced Namibian artists to digital art with a lecture in August. though the class was horri- bly under-attended, the pair captivated the audience with a range of possibilities and opportunities to enhance and inspire creativity in the new medium.

When it comes to sculpture, Alpheus Mvula was the name in lights. Merging Namibia's love for cattle with his love for chipping away at a block of marble, Mvula presented 'Oongombe', which was the first exhibition held on the Hilton Hotel's mezzanine floor.

Unlike in 2011, the 2012 students were a force to be reckoned with and in addi- tion to Unam and Cota they included Barbara Bohlke's art students who painted flowers for charity in the LifeLine/ ChildLine benefit 'Blooms for Lifeline'.

In terms of tertiary insti- tutions, Unam and Cota both presented imaginative and inspired final year works and as such 2013 looks promising in terms of new artistic recruits.

However, an element lack- ing in the student visual arts is any inclusion of the status quo and society in general.

While the students are happy to paint scenarios sprung from their mind, there is little to no comment on the world they are living in which is filled with facebook, 'pas- sion-killings', unemployment, binge-drinking, emphasis on appearance and all the other trappings of the 21st century in Namibia.

Perhaps students can ad- dress some of these things by entering Land Matters in Art which invites artists to show their negative, positive, ambivalent or indeed any emotions about land through art actions such as painting, printing, drawing, photogra- phy, sculpture, print making, mixed media, video, textile, ceramic, installation, land art or any other visual art form by January 21 to 25 2013.

Anothersection thatseems to be lagging is textiles which, just like last year, offered a few notable pieces but was generally dull and unexciting. Perhaps Batik in 'Giraffe's' tom Kenesi who is a pioneer in the batik flour technique should be called in to give a few pointers.

though the //Ae/Gams Arts and Cultural festival was as dismal as ever, one great inclusion was 'remembering Old Location', which was a tent set up full of items and photos from the time replete with two women who lived through the resettlement.

No doubt an engaging and interactive exhibit, one surely hopes we will see such inventive exhibitions from the NAGN that has recently welcomed Hercules Viljoen as its new director.

All smiles and having successfully hosted the an- nual women's exhibition and spoken to the press about his plans, Viljoen is tasked with providing a home for all these wonderful artists who are painting, sculpting and drawing their way towards a tremendous 2013.THEY say art appreciation is entirely subjective and after living through the artistic action-r play that was 2011, I was fully expecting to be subjected to cardboard prints en masse, wildlife photography by the truckload and enough paint- ings of landscapes to send me further around the bend.

However, with pencils sharper than ever and with imaginations to match, this year's offering from assorted visual artists across the country has been both miscellaneous and marvellous.

Like anything working against the status quo, 2012 began with spray paint. Not with intentionally jarring graffiti but with a quaint and clean offering from Margit Calegari whose spray paint technique was displayed at the Goethe-Zentrum in february.

Also exhibiting in the month of love was veteran painter, Paul Kiddo whose landscapes and skies over rural scenes were exhibited at the fran- co-Namibian Cultural Centre (fNCC) and earned much acclaim for the aged artist.

Similar in theme if not longevity was 'Life Sliding', by Aurélie Zannier-Wahengo that depicted bustling rural landscapes on creative seg- mented canvases.

Other local ladies who made an inspired impression this year were Susan Mitchinson, esther fellner, Helga Stein- bruck, Anita Heystek and Carina van der Merwe whose paintings were all wonderfully picturesque with a tendency towards perfection.

Less perfect though no less intriguing, was foibe Amund- aba whose whimsical 'Inviting Conversation', stood out in an otherwise dismal Cota Gradu- ateexhibition held in february. Herball-of-string-come-to-life aesthetic was noted with relief and this technique was enough to land her first exhibition at the Blue frog restaurant titled A Line of Stories'. Not one to enjoy artistic suc-

cess without giving back to the industry, Amundaba launched 'the Clay festival' in May. the festival was a celebration of Namibia's abundance of clay and invited people from all walks of life and work to make sculptures at the Camel Stable Art Studio.

Also exhibiting at the Blue frog restaurant was Pieter Basson's 'Going Nowhere', which was a quirky, Picas- so-esque offering presented in September.

In terms of stunning creativ- ity and innovation, artists erik Schnack and Papa Shikongeni were the main men.

In May Schnack confused and delighted audiences with 'Scramble', a fantastic fusion of found materials such as tin cans, bicycle chains, gears and sprockets and designed as a manifestation of his meander- ings regarding male migrant labourers as previously housed at the KCAC.

Much like Amundaba, Schnack went on to share his skills and creativity by acting as a warden of 'Speechbubble', Namibia's first comic book, along with the film society's Oshosheni Hiveluah.

Also innovative in May was Papa Shikongeni who climbed out of his cardboard box to present 'Art is U', at the House of Art at Maerua Mall. Swopping prints for zips, Shikongeni made pieces entirely out of multicoloured zips to present a new technique to Namibia.

Photographically speaking, Namibia enjoyed exhibitions by Kari Smaage, Leonie Marinovic and Kristin Capp. Capp ended the year as the first lecturer of photography at Unam and the fulbright scholar presented her first look at our country as filtered through her lens in 'Horse Latitudes', in May.

exhibitions by Smaage and Marinovic were didactic in nature and dealt with good health in the elderly and HIV respectively. One unfortunate event for

the photographic community was a lack of the Month of Photography whose nine gallery exhibitions and month of events debuted to rave re- views in 2011. Underfunded and generally agreed to be a bi-annual affair, photographers and patrons can look forward to its return in 2013.

from photography to Pho- toshop, artists Sigi Kolbe and Don Stevenson introduced Namibian artists to digital art with a lecture in August. though the class was horri- bly under-attended, the pair captivated the audience with a range of possibilities and opportunities to enhance and inspire creativity in the new medium.

When it comes to sculpture, Alpheus Mvula was the name in lights. Merging Namibia's love for cattle with his love for chipping away at a block of marble, Mvula presented 'Oongombe', which was the first exhibition held on the Hilton Hotel's mezzanine floor.

Unlike in 2011, the 2012 students were a force to be reckoned with and in addi- tion to Unam and Cota they included Barbara Bohlke's art students who painted flowers for charity in the LifeLine/ ChildLine benefit 'Blooms for Lifeline'.

In terms of tertiary insti- tutions, Unam and Cota both presented imaginative and inspired final year works and as such 2013 looks promising in terms of new artistic recruits.

However, an element lack- ing in the student visual arts is any inclusion of the status quo and society in general.

While the students are happy to paint scenarios sprung from their mind, there is little to no comment on the world they are living in which is filled with facebook, 'pas- sion-killings', unemployment, binge-drinking, emphasis on appearance and all the other trappings of the 21st century in Namibia.

Perhaps students can ad- dress some of these things by entering Land Matters in Art which invites artists to show their negative, positive, ambivalent or indeed any emotions about land through art actions such as painting, printing, drawing, photogra- phy, sculpture, print making, mixed media, video, textile, ceramic, installation, land art or any other visual art form by January 21 to 25 2013.

Anothersection thatseems to be lagging is textiles which, just like last year, offered a few notable pieces but was generally dull and unexciting. Perhaps Batik in 'Giraffe's' tom Kenesi who is a pioneer in the batik flour technique should be called in to give a few pointers.

though the //Ae/Gams Arts and Cultural festival was as dismal as ever, one great inclusion was 'remembering Old Location', which was a tent set up full of items and photos from the time replete with two women who lived through the resettlement.

No doubt an engaging and interactive exhibit, one surely hopes we will see such inventive exhibitions from the NAGN that has recently welcomed Hercules Viljoen as its new director.

All smiles and having successfully hosted the an- nual women's exhibition and spoken to the press about his plans, Viljoen is tasked with providing a home for all these wonderful artists who are painting, sculpting and drawing their way towards a tremendous 2013.

, 'pas- sion-killings', unemployment, binge-drinking, emphasis on appearance and all the other trappings of the 21st century in Namibia.

Perhaps students can ad- dress some of these things by entering Land Matters in Art which invites artists to show their negative, positive, ambivalent or indeed any emotions about land through art actions such as painting, printing, drawing, photogra- phy, sculpture, print making, mixed media, video, textile, ceramic, installation, land art or any other visual art form by January 21 to 25 2013.

Anothersection thatseems to be lagging is textiles which, just like last year, offered a few notable pieces but was generally dull and unexciting. Perhaps Batik in 'Giraffe's' tom Kenesi who is a pioneer in the batik flour technique should be called in to give a few pointers.

though the //Ae/Gams Arts and Cultural festival was as dismal as ever, one great inclusion was 'remembering Old Location', which was a tent set up full of items and photos from the time replete with two women who lived through the resettlement.

No doubt an engaging and interactive exhibit, one surely hopes we will see such inventive exhibitions from the NAGN that has recently welcomed Hercules Viljoen as its new director.

All smiles and having successfully hosted the an- nual women's exhibition and spoken to the press about his plans, Viljoen is tasked with providing a home for all these wonderful artists who are painting, sculpting and drawing their way towards a tremendous 2013.

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