West Africa: New Guidelines Directions in Fisheries Policy of the Federation of Russia in West Africa - Greenpeace Calls On the Wisdom of the Rulers

press release

Greenpeace is concerned about the new guidelines taken by the Russian authorities to strengthen their presence in the West African waters, and calls upon the wisdom of concerned West African to take in account the interest of their nation.

The call came after Russia unveiled its new strategy to catch more fish in West African waters where their ships are facing fierce competition from the other fishing nations, as well as conditions access more difficult imposed by coastal states.

The Russian federal Agency for fisheries wants to strengthen the presence of the Russian fleet in the region through agreements with African states through the provision of office equipment, Russian trucks and office equipment, the construction of three patrol vessels for Senegal and Guinea-Bissau and the acceptation of more students from West Africa in Russian universities (1).

The Russian Association of fishing enterprises, which carried operations off the western coast of Africa, also declared that it would be ideal to increase the quota of Russian fisheries up to 400 000 tonnes "

"Whatever bait to attract the West African governments, it is clear that the stocks of the species (Mackerel, Sardinella, Sardines ...) on which the Russians want to come back to fish are already widely overexploited" said Raoul Monsembula, Oceans Campaigner for Greenpeace Africa.

"Rather than how to increase pressure on foreign resources, Russia should make an effort to help its own fish stocks to regenerate for the welfare of its people," concluded Monsembula.

Between 2010 and 2012, 12 super trawlers of Murmansk Trawler Fleet, the Russian fishing company, were identified among the 29 pelagic trawlers that illegally exercised in Senegalese waters among the pirate recidivist ship Oleg Naydenov (2).

Greenpeace calls on West African governments to put forward the interests of their communities who depend by millions on fishing for their livelihoods and food security.

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