South Africa: IFPYB Cautiously Congratulates the Class of 2012

press release

Photo: S.A Educattion Department
South African students

Following the announcement of the National Senior Certificate results the IFP Youth Brigade has congratulated the Class of 2012

Reacting to the announcement of the results, IFPYB National Chairperson, and SA's youngest Member of Parliament, Mkhuleko Hlengwa MP, said; "The IFPYB congratulates the class of 2012 with caution. On one hand we have a situation of an increase to 73,9% and on the other we have to continue probing the quality of the actual pass. We need to ensure that these passes are of a qualitative quantity."

"There is still the unresolved issue of school dropouts,' Hlengwa added. "We are confronted with a situation where the number of matric candidates are always almost half of those who actually enter school in Grade 1. We, therefore, need to rise above the percentage fixation and actually deal with the very real problems in the system."

Hlengwa also lamented the pass gap between male and female learners; "Whilst we embrace the fact that girls are gaining access and performing well in schools we need to ensure that our male learners are not left behind. As a nation we cannot afford to neglect male learners in order to promote females. Both need to be developed equally. Both must be given the same treatment. A failure to do so will result in serious problems for the country moving forward."

"The critical issue of quality education should remain a priority in 2013 and beyond. The Department of Basic Education needs to improve on many fronts," added Hlengwa.

Hlengwa also noted with great concern that; "The Auditor General has pointed out that the department had only achieved 47% of its 2011/12 targets. The department also had under-spending of R43 million on human resource development and of R1 billion on infrastructure development. This points to a rudderless department in complete disarray."

"There are many grade 12's who have passed under strenuous and difficult condition; "On behalf of the IFPYB I congratulate all 2012 Grade 12's, particularly those who have had to go beyond reasonable expectations in order to pass because of poor learning conditions at home, in the community and at school. We wish you well in your future endeavours. We also would like to thank the teachers, parents and communities who have ensured that young South Africans go to school and prioritize their school work. To those who didn't make it please know that this is not the end. Very often in life a "fail" at anything is a first attempt in learning. Seize the challenge and do not give up," he added.

"The IFPYB hopes that the registration chaos in institutions of higher learning we witnessed last year will not happen this year particularly with the numbers of candidates qualifying for university entrance having increased. We believe that there is an urgent need to make FET Colleges institutions of choice and not a choice of last resort," concluded Hlengwa.

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