Voice of America (Washington, DC)

28 October 2013

Sudan: Abyei Residents Continue Vote On Joining Sudan, South Sudan

Photo: Amanda Hsiao/ENOUGH
The Ngok Dinka people are pressing for a final solution for their disputed home of Abyei, which lies on the border between Sudan and South Sudan.

Some residents in the disputed Abyei region are voting for a second day on whether to join Sudan or South Sudan, both of which claim the territory.

The three-day referendum, which began Sunday, is not sanctioned by either country's government.

Only members of the South Sudan-allied Ngok Dinka ethnic group are participating in the exercise. Nomads from the Sudan-allied Misseriya tribe say they will not recognize the results, which are expected on October 31.

A referendum on Abyei was originally scheduled for January 2011 but the two Sudans have been unable to agree who is eligible to vote. The countries nearly went to war that year because of disputes over Abyei, oil, and borders.

Referendum organizers say an estimated 65,000 people are registered to cast ballots at the 28 polling places.

Luka Biong, a spokesperson for the Abyei Referendum High Commission, told VOA that he hopes the vote will settle the final status of Abyei and bring peace to the disputed area.

"I hope this choice is going to be good for all the neighbors of the community of Abyei, whether the country they have chosen or the country they have rejected," he said. "I think the two countries will eventually benefit from the stability and peace in Abyei and from the [economic] development that we are going to see in Abyei. We hope it will add [something] to strengthen the good relationship between the two countries."

The status of the 10,000-square-kilometer area of Abyei has been in dispute since the signing of the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement that ended more than 20 years of civil war in the once-unified Sudan.

Prized for its fertile land and oil reserves, Abyei is claimed by the north and south, and is currently under United Nations' administration.

A woman votes in a polling station during a referendum in the town of Abyei, Oct. 28, 2013.

Women wait to vote inside a polling station located in a school during a referendum in the town of Abyei, Oct. 28, 2013.

A man waits inside a mosquito tent in a school to vote near a polling station during a referendum in Abyei, Oct. 27, 2013.

Men wait to vote at a school during a referendum in the town of Abyei, Oct. 27, 2013.

Voters wait in line to cast their vote, as others have their fingers dipped in ink to show they have done so, in an abandoned school used as a polling center in the disputed border region of Abyei, Oct. 27, 2013.

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InFocus

Sudan/South Sudan: Will Votes Settle Abyei's Fate?

The Ngok Dinka people are pressing for a final solution for their disputed home of Abyei, which lies on the border between Sudan and South Sudan.

As voting continues in the disputed Abyei region, opinions differ on the recognition of the outcome of the results - with the African Union describing the unilateral conduct of the ... Read more »