28 December 2013

Africa: Top PPSC Blog Posts in 2013

Photo: Global Integrity
Africa 2013.

Blog

As we're approaching the end of 2013 I would like to use the opportunity to highlight the top ten posts of the Participation, Power and Social Change blog, as well as some other interesting posts, that you might have missed.

This year we had an interesting array of posts providing commentary on events around the world, such as political change in Egypt, riots in Brazil, tragedies and revolts in Bangladesh, as well as presentations of outputs from some of our main research programmes and initiatives.

Bloggers included researchers from the IDS Participation, Power and Social Change team, some of our partners, working with us on a variety of projects and some students associated with the team through our MA course in Participation, Power and Social Change and through our PhD programme.

Welcome to all those that joined our follower-list in 2013. We now have over 450 people following our blog and compared to 2012, we have more than doubled our views, which is excellent news. We hope you have found our posts interesting and even enjoyable. Please feel free to invite others to join our follower-group and find out what we're up to.

Top 10 blog posts:

1. Participation for Development: Why is this a good time to be alive? By Robert Chambers

2. Bangladesh: Rana Plaza is a parable of globalisation by Naomi Hossain

3. From making us cry to making us act: five ways of communicating 'development' in Europe by Maria Cascant

4. The Marriage Trap: the pleasures and perils of same-sex equality by Stephen Wood

5. Bangladesh is revolting, again by Naomi Hossain

6. Storytelling in Development Practice by Hamsini Ravi

7. Missing the pulse of Egypt's citizens? by Mariz Tadros

8. I'm (still) hungry, mum: the return of Care by Naomi Hossain

9. The crisis of Brazilian democracy, as seen from Mozambique by Alex Shankland

10. Heteronormativity: why demystifying development's unspoken assumptions benefits us all by Stephen Wood

Other interesting blogs that you might have missed:

A sense of insecurity - violence, gender and agency in South Sudan by Marjoke Oosterom

'We can't wait to improve sanitation' by Petra Bongartz

Involving the world's poorest citizens in the post-2015 agenda by Joanna Wheeler

The K'dogo Economy: Food Rights and Food Riots on Harambee Avenue by Patta Scott-Villiers

To give a different nuance to our commentary and research, we've also introduced some visual blog posts this year, showing videos, photographs and cartoons. Have a look:

Work with us: Community-driven research inspiring change: Susanne Schirmer introducing a short documentary film by the Participate Initiative

Fair markets and food prices: Images from North Bengal by Naomi Hossain

Relationship Anarchy: Cartoons by Maria Ellinor Persson

Is this that time? (Será este aquele tempo?): Images from riots in Brazil by Luan Citele and Renan Otto and a poem by akshay khanna

Finally, on behalf of the Power, Participation and Social Change Team at IDS, we wish all our readers happy holidays (if you're celebrating) and a good start into 2014. We will be back with more blog posts in early January.

Sue Schirmer works as Communications Coordinator for the Participation, Power and Social Change (PPSC) team at IDS.

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