South Africa: Fourth Person Dies After Mothutlung Protests

Photo: Werner Beukes/SAPA
Service delivery protest (file photo).

Johannesburg — A fourth person has died following violent clashes near Brits over access to water, Jacarandafm News reported on Monday.

Damonsville community leader Paul Hendricks said the man died early on Monday.

"He was shot in the head with live ammunition and taken to Ga-Rankuwa hospital where the bullet was removed," he was quoted as saying.

The man was in a coma and later died.

According to SABC radio news, the 36-year-old man spent seven days in the intensive care unit of hospital. He was injured during clashes last week. His family confirmed the death.

SABC also reported that he had died, quoting his brother.

Three others who were killed during the service delivery protest in Mothutlung were buried at the weekend.

Two protesters were shot dead, allegedly by police.

Another man died after falling out of a moving police vehicle in a bid to escape, according to police.

Ads by Google

Copyright © 2014 South African Press Association. All rights reserved. Distributed by AllAfrica Global Media (allAfrica.com). To contact the copyright holder directly for corrections — or for permission to republish or make other authorized use of this material, click here.

AllAfrica publishes around 2,000 reports a day from more than 130 news organizations and over 200 other institutions and individuals, representing a diversity of positions on every topic. We publish news and views ranging from vigorous opponents of governments to government publications and spokespersons. Publishers named above each report are responsible for their own content, which AllAfrica does not have the legal right to edit or correct.

Articles and commentaries that identify allAfrica.com as the publisher are produced or commissioned by AllAfrica. To address comments or complaints, please Contact us.

InFocus

Rights Report 'Subjective' - S Africa Police

Service delivery protest (file photo).

The police ministry has described a Human Rights Watch report about officers' conduct and their ability to deal with riots as "generalising and subjective". Read more »