23 May 2014

Nigeria: U.S. Sends Aircraft, 80 Airmen to Help Nigerian Search

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Washington — This article was originally published on the Defense Department website on May 22.

The Defense Department's addition of an unmanned aerial vehicle and 80 Air Force airmen to U.S. efforts supporting Nigeria's search for over 200 missing schoolgirls has turned the mission into an air operation, Army Colonel Steve Warren, director of Pentagon Press Operations, said May 22.

The UAV system and Air Force personnel were deployed not to Nigeria but to neighboring Chad under an agreement with the Chadian government, Warren said, because basing the air assets there, closer to the search area, allows the aircraft to spend more time overhead.

The Nigerian government has requested such assistance and, Warren said, "This is the third system that we've put into Chad in addition to [systems that have] been providing [reconnaissance] up until yesterday."

The coordinated air operation is using a mix of manned and unmanned assets as the situation dictates, he added.

"I don't know right now of any plans to send additional [reconnaissance] assets, and all 80 Air Force personnel are not [yet] on the ground," Warren said, adding that there are no plans now for a U.S. military operation on the ground in Nigeria.

It's been five weeks since members of the terrorist group Boko Haram kidnapped the girls from the Government Secondary boarding school in the town of Chibok.

The Air Force personnel are joining 16 military personnel from U.S. Africa Command who earlier this month joined an interdisciplinary team led by the State Department at the U.S. Embassy in Abuja, Nigeria.

"The team in Chad is there in support of ... an unarmed, unmanned aerial vehicle that is helping support the search for the students," Pentagon spokesman Army Lieutenant Colonel Myles B. Caggins III told American Forces Press Service.

"The majority of the Air Force personnel are dedicated to the launch, recovery, and maintenance of the aircraft," Caggins added. "They have a small security detachment to round-out the team."

They are not infantry troops and will not conduct ground operations, he said.

"The weapons they deployed with are strictly for self-defense and local security at the airfield," Caggins added.

U.S. operations are around-the-clock, he noted, including time for aircraft maintenance and recovery.

The missions will take place over northern Nigeria and the surrounding area, Caggins said.

"Flying these aircraft from Chad significantly increases search time over potential Boko Haram camps in Nigeria and surrounding countries," the DOD spokesman said, adding, "We're thankful for cooperation from the government of Chad and our international partners for this basing agreement."

On May 21, during a hearing on Boko Haram before the House of Representatives' Foreign Affairs Committee, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for African Affairs Amanda J. Dory said DOD is taking action to help the Nigerian government find the students and address the growing threat posed by Boko Haram.

Initial DOD efforts involve working with Nigerian security personnel to identify shortfalls and provide requested expertise and information, she told the panel.

"We're also working closely with the U.K., France and other international partners in Abuja to coordinate multilateral actions," Dory said.

"Our intent is to support Nigerian-led efforts to safely recover the girls," she added, "and help catalyze greater efforts to secure the population of Nigeria from the menace of Boko Haram."

If sustained security is to be achieved, Dory said, the government of Nigeria must develop and implement immediate and long-term solutions to problems created by the extremist group.

The Boko Haram threat has existed in its current form since 2009 but over the past several years has extended its geographic reach and increased the sophistication and lethality of its attacks, she said.

"Along with other U.S. departments and agencies, DOD has been engaging for some time with the government of Nigeria to help build its capacity to respond," the deputy assistant secretary said.

Beginning in 2011, DOD used the State Department-led U.S.-Nigeria Bi-National Commission as a main forum to enhance counterinsurgency efforts and develop a civilian-centered approach to security, Dory said.

In late April, DOD began working with Nigeria's newly created counterterrorism-focused ranger battalion.

In addition, DOD and the State Department are working closely to enhance border security along Nigeria's borders with Chad, Niger and Cameroon, to counter the Boko Haram threat, Dory told the panel.

The idea, she said, is to build border security capacity and promote better cooperation and communication among each country's security force to reduce the extremist group's operational space and safe havens.

In the meantime, the search for the students in Nigeria is ongoing, Caggins added, and the Nigerians are in the lead.

DOD, he said, continues to lend its unique assets and capabilities to help in the search.

"We'll continue to evaluate the resources we might bring to bear in support of the effort in close consultation with the Nigerian government," Caggins said.

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