7 August 2014

Algeria: Investigators Confirm Second Black Box in Air Algerie Crash Is Not Usable

French officials investigating the Air Algerie flight that crashed in Mali killing all 116 passengers on board confirmed on Thursday that the cockpit voice recorder was not usable.

"The tape was a little bit damaged. We were able to extract it... The BEA laboratory was able to restore the tape," said Rémi Jouty, the head of France's Bureau of Investigations and Analyses (BEA) during a press conference. "Unfortunately the recordings are so far unusable."

However, Jouty said that its recording function appeared to be in tact as technicians were able to pick up a sound signal.

"We still don't know the causes of this dysfunction," he said. "It is too early to say if we will be able to obtain some information from this second black box."

Jouty added that the BEA was able to extract information from AH5017 flight's first black box, which provided details such as the plane's speed and altitude.

"We are still working in order to understand the plane's exact trajectory," he added.

He said that all the communications during the flight, which took off on July 24 from Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso bound for Algiers, between the pilots and ground patrol will be examined to understand what happened in the moments before the flight went down.

Jouty said that "deliberate action" could not be ruled out, but that bad weather was the most likely scenario.

An hour after the Mc Donnell MD83 jet left Ouagadougou the pilots asked to turn around as they encountered severe weather conditions.

N'Faly Cisse, the head of Mali's civil aviation accident commission, said that the BEA would submit a fresh progress report in mid-September.

"There will be no further updates until then," he said.

The majority of the victims hailed from France, while other passengers came from Burkina Faso, Lebanon, Algeria, Spain, Canada, Germany and Luxembourg.

French President François Hollande said that the remains of all passengers on the plane - not just the French - would be flown to France.

Ads by Google

Copyright © 2014 Radio France Internationale. All rights reserved. Distributed by AllAfrica Global Media (allAfrica.com). To contact the copyright holder directly for corrections — or for permission to republish or make other authorized use of this material, click here.

AllAfrica publishes around 2,000 reports a day from more than 130 news organizations and over 200 other institutions and individuals, representing a diversity of positions on every topic. We publish news and views ranging from vigorous opponents of governments to government publications and spokespersons. Publishers named above each report are responsible for their own content, which AllAfrica does not have the legal right to edit or correct.

Articles and commentaries that identify allAfrica.com as the publisher are produced or commissioned by AllAfrica. To address comments or complaints, please Contact us.