Are Traditional Events to Blame for High Girl-Child Pregnancies?


Elders, parents and teachers have cited traditional ceremonies involving all-night dancing as one of the reasons for the high rate of girl-child pregnancies and consequent increase in school drop-outs.

Young women perform in traditional dress in Arusha, Tanzania.

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