Africa: Japan, Unesco Sign Half-Million USD Project Agreement

Addis Ababa — The government of Japan and UNESCO International Institute for Capacity Building in Africa (IICBA) signed a project agreement worth 500 thousand USD today.

The aim of the project is to support the peace, resilience building and prevention of violent extremism in Africa through teachers' development.

The project targets twelve African countries to train atleast 3, 000 teachers and 120, 000 youth through teachers and advocacy.

The current project is the extension of the past two year's projects that was implemented by the government of Japan through teachers training and development for peace building in the Sahel and Horn of Africa regions.

During the signing ceremony, Japan Ambassador to Ethiopia, Daisuke Matsunaga noted that working on teachers' development towards peace and stability would have a paramount importance to positively influence the society.

"Our previous projects have brought encouraging outcome," he said and adding that "now peace is on the horizon in Ethiopia and Eritrea as well as a remarkable peace process in South Sudan."

IICBA Director, Yumiko Yokozeki said on her part that the support provided by the government of Japan will help the continental efforts in bringing peace across Africa.

The project will be implemented from March, 2019 to February 2020.

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