Nigeria: Malaria Cases Dropped By 6 Million in 7 Years - WHO

Mosquito.
25 April 2019

Abuja — As Nigeria joined the rest of the world to commemorate this year's world malaria day, the World Health Organization (WHO), has said that malaria cases have dropped from 206 million in 2010 to 200 million in 2017 in Africa.

WHO Regional Director for Africa, Dr Matshidiso Moeti, disclosed this at a press briefing yesterday, in Abuja.

Moeti, who was represented by WHO Nigeria Health Emergency team head, Dr. Clement Peter, said, "There are signs of progress as overall trends show that between 2010 and 2017, the estimated number of new cases of malaria in the African Region cases dropped from 206 million in 2010 to 200 million in 2017, and the number of malarial related deaths fell from 555,000 to 403,000.

"Two countries in the Region; Ethiopia and Rwanda are among 20 countries globally that experienced a significant decrease in malaria cases by more than 20 percent and deaths in 2017 compared to 2016," he said.

He noted that the 2018 edition of the World Malaria report confirms the findings of the 2017 report and revealed an increase of 3.5 million cases of malaria in the ten highest burden African countries, as compared to 2016.

He however called for a renewed political commitment to eliminate malaria and for increased investments on malaria prevention and control.

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