South Africa: As Governments Enforce Healthier Lifestyles On Us All, Iconic Brands Are Under Attack

analysis

From chocolate bars to wines, some of the world's most influential brands are being targeted by governments. There is a sensible health debate to be had around responsible consumption, but unproven laws are not the solution. Punishment is not the way to change consumer habits.

Some of the world's most iconic brands are under threat as international policymakers try to legislate consumers into healthier habits. From global giants Kraft and Nestlé to more familiar favourites such as Castle Light and Kanonkop Kadette, regulators have them all in their sights.

In 2018, the Liquor Amendment Bill was introduced to South Africa's Parliament by the Economic Freedom Fighters, which proposed a blanket ban on alcohol advertising as well as the introduction of new warning labels.

Much like the Public Health (Alcohol) Bill in Ireland, which became law in 2018, regulating advertising and promotion and introducing mandatory cancer warnings, it would also see all alcohol branding removed from sports events and teams in South Africa.

In Ireland, the very heart of where it was invented, any public promotion or reflection of the beloved Guinness brand will soon no longer be allowed -- and it's just renewed its sponsorship of the Six Nations Rugby...

See What Everyone is Watching

More From: Daily Maverick

Don't Miss

AllAfrica publishes around 600 reports a day from more than 150 news organizations and over 500 other institutions and individuals, representing a diversity of positions on every topic. We publish news and views ranging from vigorous opponents of governments to government publications and spokespersons. Publishers named above each report are responsible for their own content, which AllAfrica does not have the legal right to edit or correct.

Articles and commentaries that identify allAfrica.com as the publisher are produced or commissioned by AllAfrica. To address comments or complaints, please Contact us.