Kenya: 2 Kenyans Among Foreign Nationals Affected in South Africa Xenophobic Attacks - MFA

13 September 2019

Nairobi — Kenya's Ministry of Foreign Affairs says two Kenyans have been affected following the resurgence of xenophobic attacks in South Africa.

Foreign Affairs Cabinet Secretary Monica Juma said the Foreign Office was in contact with the Pretoria-based High Commission to ensure the safety of Kenyans residing in the South African nation.

"We woke up to troubling news about xenophobic attacks against non-nationals in several places in South Africa. Our Embassy in South Africa is in close contact with the Government to ensure the safety of Kenyans and protection of their property," she said in a brief statement released Wednesday afternoon.

"We welcome the strong condemnation of these attacks by the Government of South Africa and hope that the ethos and values of Pan Africans will prevail over narrow nationalisms, and be the bonds that glue us together, as African brothers and sisters," CS Juma emphasized.

Meanwhile, South Africa and Nigeria stepped security on Wednesday after deadly attacks on foreign-owned stores in Johannesburg triggered reprisal assaults on South African businesses in Nigerian cities, the AFP reported.

The centre of Johannesburg and the impoverished suburb of Alexandra were calm as police stepped up patrols following two days of looting, AFP reporters saw.

Shops cautiously began to open again, as some residents sifted around in wrecked stores, looking for food.

Amid mounting concern for relations between South Africa and its neighbours and Nigeria -- the continent's most populous market -- President Cyril Ramaphosa reiterated his condemnation of the violence.

"We face a huge challenge. A number of people (are) taking the law into their own hands," he said in Cape Town, ahead of a three-day meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF) due to be attended by 15 African leaders.

"Taking action against people of other countries is not right," he said.

"South Africa is home for all. We are not the only country that has become home for people fleeing."

Five people, most of them South Africans, have been killed and at least 289 have been arrested since the violence flared on Sunday.

Dozens of shops have been destroyed in Johannesburg and nearby Pretoria, the country's political capital.

Trucks suspected of being driven by foreigners have also been torched in the southeastern province of KwaZulu-Natal

South Africa is a major destination for economic migrants from neighbouring Lesotho, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. But others come from much farther away, including South Asia and Nigeria.

The influx has led to sporadic outbreaks of violence against foreign businesses, sparked by the perception that jobs are being taken away from South Africans

In 2008, xenophobic violence left 62 dead, while in 2015, seven people were killed in attacks in Johannesburg and Durban.

But the latest rash of attacks has sparked particular concern. It comes against a background of persistently grim news about the economy. Nearly one in three of South Africans are unemployed.

In Nigeria, police on Wednesday said security had been strengthened around South African businesses after apparent reprisal attacks in several cities against stores operated by the supermarket chain Shoprite, the telecoms giant MTN and other firms.

Nigeria on Tuesday summoned the South African ambassador for talks and said President Muhammadu Buhari was sending an envoy to convey his displeasure to Ramaphosa.

Similar messages of concern have been voiced by South Africa's neighbours.

In Zimbabwe, President Emmerson Mnangagwa said: "We strongly condemn all forms of hate driven violence and applaud the South African authorities for the swift way they have responded."

In Botswana, the ministry of international affairs and cooperation urged all citizens living in or travelling to South Africa "to exercise extreme caution... (and) avoid areas where unrests are currently occurring."

See What Everyone is Watching

More From: Capital FM

Don't Miss

AllAfrica publishes around 700 reports a day from more than 140 news organizations and over 500 other institutions and individuals, representing a diversity of positions on every topic. We publish news and views ranging from vigorous opponents of governments to government publications and spokespersons. Publishers named above each report are responsible for their own content, which AllAfrica does not have the legal right to edit or correct.

Articles and commentaries that identify allAfrica.com as the publisher are produced or commissioned by AllAfrica. To address comments or complaints, please Contact us.