Angola Deposits Instrument Against Torture At UN

President Paul Kagame speaks at a High-Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage which was organised on the margins of the 74th United Nations General Assembly underway in New York.

New York — Angola will deposit the instruments of ratification of the Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or punishment at UN headquarters in New York.

The act should take place during the 74th annual session of the United Nations General Assembly, whose general debate begins on 24 September.

Angola will be represented at the General Assembly with a high level delegation headed by the President of the Republic, João Lourenço.

The Angolan Parliament has approved the Resolution 38/19 of 16 July, which ratifies the UN Convention against Torture, but this process is only concluded with the deposit of instruments of ratification with the United Nations Secretariat.

By depositing these documents with UN structures, the country marks a historic step in the convention against torture, considered one of the most important bulwarks of modern civilization against abuse of power.

Angola has already ratified several international human rights treaties with a view to strengthening the protection of these rights at national level.

These documents include the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, on the Abolition of the Death Penalty.

It has also ratified Protocol II to the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949 on the Protection of Victims of Non-International Armed Conflict, the Convention on the Status of Stateless Persons and the convention to reduce the number of cases of statelessness.

With the ratification of these instruments Angola fulfills its international commitments, especially as a member state of the United Nations Human Rights Council for the period 2018-2020.

Angola is a State Party to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the international covenant on economic social and cultural rights, as well as the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

However, more than thirty years after its entry into force in 1984, The Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (commonly known as the United Nations Convention against Torture (UNCAT)) is still far from universal ratification.

To date 164 of the 193 UN member countries have signed or ratified the Convention, but only 64 have stated that, as provided for in Article 22, they recognize the competence of the Committee against Torture to receive individual complaints.

In the meantime, the United Nations Committee against Torture, which is responsible for monitoring the measures taken by States Parties, must submit its annual report to the UN General Assembly. The committee consists of ten independent experts.

The ratification of the Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or punishment leads to enormous international support for the necessary reforms in relevant sectors of a given country.

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