Kenya: TSC to Train Teachers on New Curriculum

17 November 2019

The Teachers Service Commission (TSC) will train 68,490 teachers on new curriculum in December, Chief Executive Officer Nancy Macharia has said.

The implementation of Competency-Based Curriculum enters Grade Four in January next year.

Ms Macharia said a total of 91,620 teachers were trained in April while 68, 490 were trained in August this year.

She said this will ensure teachers are adequately prepared for the new curriculum.

"We thank teachers for their selfless service to the nation and assure them of our support," said the TSC boss on Sunday.

GRADE FOUR

Meanwhile, plans by the government to distribute Grade Four text books to public schools are underway.

The target is to have books in 22,000 public primary schools across the country by end of November.

During a meeting held at KICD, Deputy Director-Primary Education at the Ministry of Education, Nereah Olick said the ministry had shared a list of learners per school with publishers. The list will help in determining the number of books that each school should get.

Ms Olick challenged publishers to share any challenges they experience.

She warned that there will be no extension of the exercise. She said who fail to meet the deadline risk having their contracts cancelled.

The publishers and the distributors will have to first contact sub-county education officers delivering the books to schools.

A list of approved books has been published on the KICD website to ensure parents and teachers are well guided.

WRONG BOOKS

"You need to work as a team and ensure that Grade 4 textbooks are delivered to schools in time ahead of the rollout of the CBC in Grade Four, next year," KICD Chief Executive Officer, Dr Julius Jwan told publishers.

Any delays or deviation from the schedule, he added, will not be tolerated. The Kenya Publishers Association Chairman Lawrence Njagi has assured Kenyans that the books will be delivered in time. Mr Njagi also asked publishers to adhere to their contractual obligations.

"We don't want short-cuts or any sideshows that could derail the process. The approved books must be available in schools and bookshops in time so that unscrupulous traders don't take advantage of a shortage to dupe parents into buying wrong books," Mr Njagi said.

The books to be distributed are; Kiswahili, English, Mathematics, Social Studies, CRE, IRE, Home science, Agriculture, Science and Technology, Music, Arts and Craft, Physical and Health Education. The government provides only one course book per learning area.

See What Everyone is Watching

More From: Nation

Don't Miss

AllAfrica publishes around 700 reports a day from more than 140 news organizations and over 500 other institutions and individuals, representing a diversity of positions on every topic. We publish news and views ranging from vigorous opponents of governments to government publications and spokespersons. Publishers named above each report are responsible for their own content, which AllAfrica does not have the legal right to edit or correct.

Articles and commentaries that identify allAfrica.com as the publisher are produced or commissioned by AllAfrica. To address comments or complaints, please Contact us.