Zimbabwe: Sani Makhalima Laments Zim's Leadership Crisis in New Track

22 November 2019

Faded urban grooves vocalist, Sani Makhalima has resurfaced, albeit in unconventional style, this time offering a politically conscious single titled "Vatiregerera" that speaks about a crisis in political leadership that has led to political intolerance and worsening poverty levels in Zimbabwe.

The song released this week is accompanied by a solemn video reminiscent of scenes from the brutal attacks on civilians by the military post-2018 harmonized elections in Harare CDB and various other scenes of protests by disgruntled citizens in recent times.

It also capture civil servants calls for better wages, political victims bruised and desperation of citizens who turn to prostitution for survival.

Here Makhalima ventures into a poignant narration of despair that heavily settles within the life of an ordinary Zimbabwean youth who "dare not to dream anymore" as hard work is no longer rewarding.

He laments the deepening levels of poverty, unrestrained corruption by authorities and the muzzling of critiquing voices through violent means which include beating up of civilians by military and police.

The song also speaks about engraved animosity that defines Zimbabwe's broken down society likening it to a bitter cold war.

"My country Zimbabwe has been in a bitter cold war, hard work, honesty and sweat don't work here. Meritocracy and democracy fall on deaf ears. Zimbabwe is open for business they say, right, what kind of business is this where there is no light from four in the morning to eleven in the evening? There is no electricity and how do we start living," goes the lyrics from the song.

Makhalima can not envisage any positive outcomes from the current establishment and can only hope for heavenly intervention.

"Mwari Baba totarisira kwamuri, tinzwireiwo nyasha, vatungamiri vatiregerera," the chorus goes.

The song deviates from Sani's trademark love serenades and boldly questions political actors at the top echelons of power for their failures to create a sustainable society for development.

But critiquing power in Zimbabwe has become a privilege for the daring as noted from the credits the song has received on Youtube.

"Be careful my guy this country is no longer safe to expose such truths," said Clever Chikanda before one Brenda Jahwi wrote, " Powerful song, I hope you will be safe, may God protect you,"

See What Everyone is Watching

More From: 263Chat

Don't Miss

AllAfrica publishes around 700 reports a day from more than 140 news organizations and over 500 other institutions and individuals, representing a diversity of positions on every topic. We publish news and views ranging from vigorous opponents of governments to government publications and spokespersons. Publishers named above each report are responsible for their own content, which AllAfrica does not have the legal right to edit or correct.

Articles and commentaries that identify allAfrica.com as the publisher are produced or commissioned by AllAfrica. To address comments or complaints, please Contact us.