Tanzania: Special Land Zone Set Up in Morogoro

THE government has established a special zone for land issues in Morogoro, a move expected to end land disputes in the region.

The region has been beset by a number of land conflicts, particularly between pastoralists and farmers.

Minister for Lands, Housing and Human Settlements Development, Mr William Lukuvi, said introduction of the special zone was driven by the widespread problem, which affects development activities.

Mr Lukuvi was speaking in Morogoro during a stakeholders' consultative meeting involving the government, business people and investors.

Considering the importance of the region in agriculture and livestock keeping, President John Magufuli directed the ministry to form a special zone for this region, Mr Lukuvi said.

"From now on everything will be done here without bothering going to head offices of the ministry," he stated.

However, apart from that directive, the government, through the land management programme, has already surveyed every piece of land in Kilombero, Ulanga and Malinyi districts.

Mr Lukuvi said the programme had facilitated surveying of land and issuance of at least 300,000 customary title Continues on Page 3 Continues on Page 3 Of the 144 samples of veterinary medicines examined during the period, 90 per cent continued to meet the quality criterion deeds, thus making the region leading in provision of many title deeds.

The minister noted that a total of 920 out of 975 villages that were supposed to be dissolved after encroaching reserved forests will now remain intact and the villages were even allowed to conduct the recent civic polls.

"These villages are no longer called intruders, and my ministry will deploy experts to go and re-survey the areas and issue new title deeds to owners," he explained.

Mr Lukuvi further said that over 46,715 acres that were previously used as reserved forests were given to farmers and pastoralists.

Initially, a leader of pastoralists from Mvomero district, Mr Shamba Longido, asked the government to give more land to pastoralists whose number was consistently rising.

However, he admitted that land conflicts between the pastoralists and farmers had largely been reduced, and allocating more land to pastoralists for grazing would completely end such disputes.

He also appealed to the government to convince investors to establish dairy industries there so that they get reliable market for their milk.

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