South Africa: Injury-Related Deaths Among Children On the Rise in South Africa

analysis

The 14th Children's Gauge report on child health was published on Tuesday 10 December. One of the new challenges highlighted in the report is the growing number of children dying from injuries, with young schoolchildren being the most vulnerable.

The leading cause of death among adolescents is injuries, with a growing number of children dying as a result of injuries, according to the latest Child Gauge report published on Tuesday, 10 December.

The annual report, published by the Children's Institute at the University of Cape Town, looks at children's rights and progress made in specific areas. The 2019 report focuses on child and adolescent health and looks at new challenges to child health, one of which is child safety.

"Children are vulnerable by virtue of their constitution, but they're also vulnerable because of the environments in which they're put," Ashley van Niekerk, violence and injury researcher at the Medical Research Council, told Daily Maverick.

Van Niekerk co-wrote the Child Gauge chapter on child injuries along with Shanaaz Mathews, director of the Children's Institute. In the report, they outline the leading causes of child injury deaths as: traffic injuries (36%), homicide (28.2%), burns and drowning (27.3%), and suicide (8.5%).

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