Liberia: Imam Ali Krayee Wants Complete Overhaul of Education System

... In order to win the battle against corruption in Liberia

The Chief Imam of Liberia, Sheikh Ali Krayee, has called for the complete overhaul of the country's education system so as to win the battle against corruption.

Krayee spoke at the occasion marking the observance of this year's World Anti Corruption Day in Ganta, Nimba County on Monday, December 9, 2019.

He said moral education is almost absent from the curriculum, and has therefore made the education system to lose it once merit.

"Morality is what discipline people, and with the virtual absence of moral education; and collapse of the merit system in most school, those we called educational institutions have largely produced a generation of clever devils," he said.

This year's commemoration was held under the theme, "Together, We are United against Corruption."

With this theme, Imam Krayee cautioned Liberians not to a part of this struggle, and at the same time, remain among the countless self-centered individuals, whose appetite for corruption is unbending.

He said corruption has never lost any battle against its enemies, and some cases it suffers temporary setbacks.

He maintained that corruption gets reinforced and launcher a counter attack that forces those who fight it to beg for mercy.

Imam Krayee said, before the war in Liberia, academic corruption was somewhat unpopular, where student aspired to places of admiration among their colleagues, while their role models were men and women, who proved to be exceptions in terms of their intellectual ability.

"Teachers were generally self-respecting personalities, and they were highly respecting in the communion and rural areas," he said.

He added that morality was in some ways promoted, but the country's 24 years civil war created a brain drain in a nation that was already low in terms of literacy.

Imam Krayee said that in the aftermath of the war, those trained teachers were replaced by unqualified ones, and those unqualified ones became the available teachers.

Imam Krayee, who was vocal in his deliberation, said, "The fact that even teachers failed WAEC, it is a conspicuous evidence that what we have is not merely a messy education system, but a national disaster."

Rhetorically, he asked, "how do you expect a nation that institutionalizes fraud in her education sector to fight corruption?"

He said, probably, most of our people were traumatized by their experiences during the war years, then the students, who should be prepared to build the nation were brought up to believed that is just a word and success is a product of chance.

"Unless the education sector is revived in a serious and fundamental way, there is no hope that we will be united against corruption," he said.

Deputy Auditor General, Wingley S. Nanka, urged students to conduct themselves with integrity and stop cheating during public exams.

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