Nigeria: Stop Probe - Enemies At Work

Early press reports say eleven Nigerians are currently being investigated for a $6 million fraud in the United States of America. It is unclear whether this investigation is part of the $11 million fraud for which Obinwanne Okeke, aka Invictus, has pleaded guilty and for which he is now to serve 20 years behind bars.

In 2016, when Okeke was 28-years old, he featured on Forbes' list of Africa's Under-30 Most Promising Entrepreneurs. It was a meteoric rise to fame for a child who lost his father at the age of 16 and was passed from one relative to another like his 16 other siblings. Okeke claimed to have a bachelor and a master's degree in international studies; forensic criminology and counter-terrorism studies respectively. If true, he studied the theory of fraud and went on to put it into practice, which in other disciplines would be acceptable.

Okeke rose to prominence when his company, Invictus Group, came under FBI investigation for wire fraud. Before then, he had spread his tentacles into oil and gas, agriculture, science and technology. He even started a foundation for the underprivileged according to a report compiled by GuardianTV.

Obi was on a visitor's visa to America when he was captured and he'll need all the help for an early release. The Invictus is neither unconquered nor invincible; he has left an odious stain on hard work, perseverance and diligence - hallmarks of the average Nigerian success story.

The Nigerian social stratosphere is littered with young men and women of unquestionable opulence flashing their ill-gotten wealth to others. They tell young people that hard work and diligence offer no earthly reward. Faced with a government that caters solely to the greed of ten percent of the population, the recycled ruling clique who control the nation's wealth; the unwashed masses have no role model.

Who wants to work hard when one political appointment is what is required to bridge the gulf between poverty; penury and ostentatious lifestyle? Who wants to sweat out and wait for years to 'blow' when they are fed on a melody that declares that Aliko Dangote and Mike Otedola, two of Nigeria's rooted millionaires do not have two-heads?

Life is littered with people who burnt the midnight oil to earn worthless paper qualifications but never feature as national influencers or have a brand name. Bennet Omalu, a US-based forensic pathologist, discovered chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the link between concussion, mental illness and contact sports. Another Oluyinka Olutoye, a pediatric surgeon operated on a pregnant woman to correct a fetal abnormality and reinserted the child back to its mother's womb to complete full gestation and birth. Bashir Isa Dodo, a systems engineer, has segmented the retina into seven layers to revolutionise ophthalmic surgery.

Ask your children if they know any of these three and you'll be an A-parent if you get one right answer. Ask them if they know #Adeherself, aka Ademola Adewale, and their precocious faces are most likely to light up. She was recently arrested with several others over a N9 million fraud investigation.

On Instagram, where the stupendously wealthy expose their stupendous wealth to the wretched wannabes, Ms Adewale is a successful model but the EFCC swears she's the matron of a ring scamming people on the Internet. She tips the scale for criminal gender balance.

That is more than you could say of Raymond Igbalodey, aka Hushpuppi. Born June 14, 1988, Hushpuppi agonises about his poor lifestyle. He watched his parents kneel before poverty, watched his elder sister succumb to typhoid because she couldn't pay hospital bills. But he lives his life on the fly, addicted to the Gucci brand, flashy cars and mouth-watering meals often served 35,000 miles above sea level on private jets or in five-star hotels. He flashed his bling to Daddy Freeze and maverick one-time senator, Dino Melaye, whose own opulence is an inexplicable accident.

Husspuppi is now helping the Americans and the Dubai police sort out the source of his $20 million wealth and the several bank accounts traced to him.

While Nigeria wants to clean up its battered image, it has a sad record of bungled prosecution of obviously simple cases whose characters somehow make it to the top of the political echelon. Political fraudsters buy perpetual immunity - like Peter Odili, James Ibori and recently Orji Uzor Kalu.

Late last year, the case against Ismaila Mustapha, aka Mompha, accused of N33 billion fraud was bungled. He was granted bail in the sum of N100 million! He has returned to Dubai and the flashy life.

Recently, Mudashiru Obasa, the Speaker of the Lagos parliament, brushed off an N80 million fraud allegations. He used the money to fly the wives of his colleagues to Dubai and spent another N53 million on a trip to America with his sidekick. Obasa responded that not only is he not guilty, but that the law allows him to spend N100 million without auditing. He described the allegations as the handwork of his enemies. There you have it, probe unnecessary, call in the spiritual army to stop the enemies at work. E

arly press reports say eleven Nigerians are currently being investigated for a $6 million fraud in the United States of America. It is unclear whether this investigation is part of the $11 million fraud for which Obinwanne Okeke, aka Invictus, has pleaded guilty and for which he is now to serve 20 years behind bars.

In 2016, when Okeke was 28-years old, he featured on Forbes' list of Africa's Under-30 Most Promising Entrepreneurs. It was a meteoric rise to fame for a child who lost his father at the age of 16 and was passed from one relative to another like his 16 other siblings. Okeke claimed to have a bachelor and a master's degree in international studies; forensic criminology and counter-terrorism studies respectively. If true, he studied the theory of fraud and went on to put it into practice, which in other disciplines would be acceptable.

Okeke rose to prominence when his company, Invictus Group, came under FBI investigation for wire fraud. Before then, he had spread his tentacles into oil and gas, agriculture, science and technology. He even started a foundation for the underprivileged according to a report compiled by GuardianTV.

Obi was on a visitor's visa to America when he was captured and he'll need all the help for an early release. The Invictus is neither unconquered nor invincible; he has left an odious stain on hard work, perseverance and diligence - hallmarks of the average Nigerian success story.

The Nigerian social stratosphere is littered with young men and women of unquestionable opulence flashing their ill-gotten wealth to others. They tell young people that hard work and diligence offer no earthly reward. Faced with a government that caters solely to the greed of ten percent of the population, the recycled ruling clique who control the nation's wealth; the unwashed masses have no role model.

Who wants to work hard when one political appointment is what is required to bridge the gulf between poverty; penury and ostentatious lifestyle? Who wants to sweat out and wait for years to 'blow' when they are fed on a melody that declares that Aliko Dangote and Mike Otedola, two of Nigeria's rooted millionaires do not have two-heads?

Life is littered with people who burnt the midnight oil to earn worthless paper qualifications but never feature as national influencers or have a brand name. Bennet Omalu, a US-based forensic pathologist, discovered chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the link between concussion, mental illness and contact sports. Another Oluyinka Olutoye, a pediatric surgeon operated on a pregnant woman to correct a fetal abnormality and reinserted the child back to its mother's womb to complete full gestation and birth. Bashir Isa Dodo, a systems engineer, has segmented the retina into seven layers to revolutionise ophthalmic surgery.

Ask your children if they know any of these three and you'll be an A-parent if you get one right answer. Ask them if they know #Adeherself, aka Ademola Adewale, and their precocious faces are most likely to light up. She was recently arrested with several others over a N9 million fraud investigation.

On Instagram, where the stupendously wealthy expose their stupendous wealth to the wretched wannabes, Ms Adewale is a successful model but the EFCC swears she's the matron of a ring scamming people on the Internet. She tips the scale for criminal gender balance.

That is more than you could say of Raymond Igbalodey, aka Hushpuppi. Born June 14, 1988, Hushpuppi agonises about his poor lifestyle. He watched his parents kneel before poverty, watched his elder sister succumb to typhoid because she couldn't pay hospital bills. But he lives his life on the fly, addicted to the Gucci brand, flashy cars and mouth-watering meals often served 35,000 miles above sea level on private jets or in five-star hotels. He flashed his bling to Daddy Freeze and maverick one-time senator, Dino Melaye, whose own opulence is an inexplicable accident.

Husspuppi is now helping the Americans and the Dubai police sort out the source of his $20 million wealth and the several bank accounts traced to him.

While Nigeria wants to clean up its battered image, it has a sad record of bungled prosecution of obviously simple cases whose characters somehow make it to the top of the political echelon. Political fraudsters buy perpetual immunity - like Peter Odili, James Ibori and recently Orji Uzor Kalu.

Late last year, the case against Ismaila Mustapha, aka Mompha, accused of N33 billion fraud was bungled. He was granted bail in the sum of N100 million! He has returned to Dubai and the flashy life.

Recently, Mudashiru Obasa, the Speaker of the Lagos parliament, brushed off an N80 million fraud allegations. He used the money to fly the wives of his colleagues to Dubai and spent another N53 million on a trip to America with his sidekick. Obasa responded that not only is he not guilty, but that the law allows him to spend N100 million without auditing. He described the allegations as the handwork of his enemies. There you have it, probe unnecessary, call in the spiritual army to stop the enemies at work.

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