Zimbabwe: MDC-T Demands Share of Chamisa's 2.1m 2018 Presidential Votes

Opposition politician Nelson Chamisa (file photo).

MDC-T secretary-general Douglas Mwonzora says his party should get a share of the 2.1 million votes that MDC Alliance president, Nelson Chamisa garnered in the 2018 presidential elections.

Chamisa narrowly lost the 2018 presidential election to President Emmerson Mnangagwa while reinstated MDC-T president, Thokozani Khupe got 45 000 votes when she contested under her smaller MDC-T which she has since disbanded.

However, Chamisa continues to disregard the result claiming the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission (ZEC) rigged the results in favour of Mnangagwa.

In an interview with the SABC over the weekend, Mwonzora said some of the votes garnered by Chamisa should be allocated to his MDC-T.

He argued his MDC-T, then under the MDC Alliance banner, contributed to Chamisa's votes.

"It is fair that we share the (presidential) popularity vote there, we share the votes there. We (MDC-T), contributed to the 2.1 million votes that you are talking about," Mwonzora said.

"The MDC-T performed very, very well in the presidential election in 2018. We were the top politicians there (MDC Alliance). I was the secretary general, Morgen Komichi was the national chairperson and Elias Mudzuri was the Vice President," he said.

However, the three politicians have regrouped with Khupe following a Supreme Court judgment in March that ruled Chamisa was an illegitimate leader of the MDC-T.

The Supreme Court also ordered the MDC-T to hold an extraordinary congress within three months to elect a new leader to replace the late founding leader, Morgan Tsvangirai.

Tsvangirai died in 2018.

Chamisa has distanced himself from the special congress arguing the MDC Alliance was never before the courts, and he would not participate.

Mwonzora also confirmed in the interview that he was seeking to be elected the new president of the MDC-T at the congress set for July 31, but the final decision rested with the voting delegates.

"It is up to the MDC-T congress delegates and if they give me that honour, I will be able to serve in that office. It will be an honour to serve my party and an honour to serve my country if I have to be given an opportunity to do so.

"We are going to the extraordinary congress and elect a president, a legitimate president. But other people have refused to abide by the Supreme Court ruling, to abide by the constitution of the party."

The Manicaland province senator said his fallout with Chamisa was that the latter was unwilling to follow the party's constitution and a court order.

"He is refusing to follow a simple court order. He is refusing to follow the constitution of the party. For me, constitutions are not there for decoration, they are there to be followed, and if you follow your constitution, you can convince Zimbabweans and the world at large that you are a candidate fit to follow the national Constitution.

"The other difference is to allow Robert Mugabe's henchmen to take an active part in the party. I respectfully disagree with that. My differences with Honourable Chamisa are not personal, they are differences on the basis of principles," said Mwonzora.

He also dismissed as "totally rubbish", reports that the MDC-T had turned to be a Zanu PF and Mnangagwa project meant to destabilise the opposition.

"That is totally rubbish. We have developed a difference in opinion over a simple matter to the court judgment, disregarding the constitution. That does not make us Zanu PF. We have nothing to do with Zanu PF.

"So what you see is a fight between forces of democracy and forces of conservatism, dictatorship. We hope to have our extraordinary congress and put this fight behind us."

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