South Africa: The Mandela Rhodes Foundation Could Remain As a Symbol of the Magnanimous Spirit in Which It Was Founded

opinion

Universities and governments are now grappling with the challenge of structural change to undo racist and colonial attitudes, discrimination and injustice. Cecil John Rhodes was an arch colonialist and mining magnate in southern Africa who was associated with the harshest aspects of imperial rule. Yet, the Mandela Rhodes Foundation should stand tall.

There was a hushed silence as the late Nelson Mandela walked the full length of the cavernous Westminster Hall slowly, supported on one side by then British Prime Minister Tony Blair and, on the other, by former US President Bill Clinton.

The date was 30 June 2003 as 1,000 of the great and the good alongside the 650 members of the House of Commons and 300 peers from the House of Lords gathered in the hall where Charles I, the only British monarch ever to be executed, was sentenced to death for treason in 1649.

The occasion was the hitherto unthinkable linking of the names of Mandela, the symbol of black liberation in South Africa and a global icon of racial justice, and Cecil John Rhodes, that arch colonialist and mining magnate in southern Africa who was associated with the harshest aspects of imperial rule.

Rhodes attended Oxford...

More From: Daily Maverick

Don't Miss

AllAfrica publishes around 800 reports a day from more than 130 news organizations and over 500 other institutions and individuals, representing a diversity of positions on every topic. We publish news and views ranging from vigorous opponents of governments to government publications and spokespersons. Publishers named above each report are responsible for their own content, which AllAfrica does not have the legal right to edit or correct.

Articles and commentaries that identify allAfrica.com as the publisher are produced or commissioned by AllAfrica. To address comments or complaints, please Contact us.