Angola Olympics Elimination Blamed On Internet

Luanda — Angola is eliminated from the World Chess Olympics by losing consecutively due to lack of attendance, due to the successive drop of the internet signal, especially in the six rounds disputed, out of the nine planned, in this 3rd phase of the tournament (Group B).

In the online event, due to the propagation of covid -19, Angola finished undefeated in the 2nd phase, last week, but Friday, at the entrance of the third stage, faced an unforeseen opponent, the Internet, recording defeats until the imminent situation of victory.

This Saturday, the national team was again "victim" of the internet signal (Zap Fibre), losing with Botswana for the fourth round, by 0-6, for fall of the signal.

The same situation was repeated in the next two rounds, with Chinese Taipei losing to Round 5 (0-6) and Sri Lanka to Round 6 (2-4), in a game in which they were not allowed to lose if they wanted to qualify for the next round.

With zero points in the standings, even if Angola win Sunday's three challenges against Nigeria (round 7), Tajikistan (8th) and United Arab Emirates (9th) have no chance to continue in the competition.

The group, composed of ten teams, is led by Portugal with 12 points, followed by IPAC (team composed of disabled athletes -9 pts), Sri Lanka (9), Scotland (8).

Angola and Nigeria are the only teams that have not scored yet.

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