Liberia: Covid-19 Cases Decline, Dr. Jerry Brown Discloses As Insurance Company of Africa Donates Supplement to Battle the Virus

Monrovia — The Chief Administrator of the John F. Kennedy Memorial Medical Center (JFK), Dr. Jerry Brown, has disclosed that the number of positive COVID-19 cases is reducing on a daily basis.

Speaking Thursday, August 13, when the Insurance Company of Africa donated a consignment of essential drugs to the General Service Agency, Dr. Brown said the case ratio has shown that Liberia has made a significant improvement in its incident management.

"Although you will see the number of cases in Liberia going up, but the truth is that the number of positive cases we are having on a daily basis have significantly reduced," Dr. Brown said.

As of August 11, the total number of confirmed cases in Liberia was 1,252, total death was 82, total recovery 738, while the number of active cases stands at 432.

However, FrontPageAfrica recently reported that a prominent infectious disease scientist, Dr. Dougbeh Chris Nyan said that Liberia's testing "regime for COVID-19 is completely inaccurate and there needs to be an investigation into the wrong testing results repeatedly produce by the National Public Health Reference Lab for patients or people tested for SARS-CoV-2 which causes the COVID-19 disease."

But Dr. Brown said the current active number of cases shows that the prevalent of the disease is reducing and health authority is currently decommissioning some Precautionary Observation Centers (POC) across the country, stating, "Now that we have a reduction, we are trying to close down."

Currently according to him, some counties have started gravitating from response stages to preparedness stages.

He added that the donation of the "Selenium drug supplements" by the Insurance Company of Africa is important at this time of Liberia's incident management.

According to Dr. Brown, though the drug supplement is sent for the 14 Military Hospital, health authority sees it as an important tool to COVID-19 response.

The JFK Chief Administrator further explained that the drugs will be shared with other facilities that lack essential supplements.

Donating the items to the National COVID-19 Response Taskforce, the General Manager of ICA, Wilberforce Aboagye said the donation was ICA own way of helping to build the immune system of people during the COVID-19 period.

"The number of cases is high, so ICA thought to come in with drugs to help build the immune system of patients," Mr. Aboagye noted.

"If your immune system is built-up, it will help you fight COVID-19."

He added that the Selenium drug supplement was selected after a careful research was done on it importance to building the human immune system.

Receiving the donation, General Services Agency Director General and National Coordinator for COVID-19 Response Mary Broh lauded ICA for the donation.

"Thank you so much because, it will help someone. We are taking the consignment to the 14 Military Hospital," Broh said.

Madam Broh assured ICA that the drugs will be used for its intended purpose.

She promised to ensure that none of the drug will be sold on the Liberian market.

Recounting the Ebola crisis, she said the drug is not strange to Liberia, relative to building the immune system.

"This is a very good supplement, trust me, and the first group that brought it to Liberia was the Ghanaians," Madam Broh maintained.

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