Liberia: Weah Turns 'Campaigner'

-Vigorously Campaigning For Dual Citizenship

President George Weah Is Not Leaving Any Stone Unturned In His Quest To Make The Act Of Dual Citizenship Becomes A Law.

He is vigorously campaigning for a proposition [dual citizenship] set for the December 8, 2020 referendum.

December 8, 2020, is a day set aside by the Liberian Legislature for the conduct of the 2020 Senatorial elections alongside a referendum to change provisions in the 1986 Constitution of Liberia.

The expected propositions to be voted upon for changes after the December 8, 2020 election include dual citizenship for natural born Liberians, reduction in the tenure of elected government officials and the changing of the election date from raining season in October to the dry season in November of each election year. Proposition one which focuses on dual citizenship for natural born Liberians is the one that more attention is given to by the Liberian leader.

Speaking on Tuesday at the Duala Market dedication ceremony, President Weah indicated that he is not seeking the changes in the law for his benefit, but for the benefits of others.

He boosted that he has traveled the world over and has seen it all adding "This referendum is good for you Liberian people, it is not for me."

President Weah went on to say, "The referendum is good for you because some of you have children out of this country and your children can not be foreigners."

He furthered "As a Liberian, imagine George Mannah Weah Jr. someone says is a foreigner he cannot come back to Liberia and become a citizen. Think about it, your children need home."

President Weah passionately and vigorously speaking about the dual citizenship proposal said "Some of them are successful, but they do not have ownership, the referendum is a proposed one, make it happen."

The Liberian leader additionally said nothing wrong with Liberians taking on other nationalities and returning to their motherland as citizens.

Much is not hear about the referendum which is expected to run side-by- side with the senatorial elections, with the recent campaign by the Liberian leader, it is anticipated that supporters of the president will focus on dual citizenship proposal.

Symbols are being used by the National Elections Commission (NEC) for the proposed referendum.

The symbols with two passport means one can be naturalized citizen in another country and keep his or her Liberian citizen while the one with the one passport indicates that you cannot be a citizen of another Country and still keep your Liberian citizenship.

Proposition one focuses on dual citizenship for natural born Liberians.

Proposition two of the referendum highlights reduction in the tenure of elected government officials.

The symbol with the small chair means small year in office meaning the tenure of proposition will reduce from six years to five years; representative from six to five years and senator from nine years to seven years.

The symbol with the big chair means plenty years in office which implies that the tenure of the president should remain as six years, representative six years and senator nine years.

Some Liberians have described him as a good campaign manager for the proposition. "Our president is talented. From footballer, to basket ball player, to volley ball player, to ping pong player and even a dancer. See, in recent times, he has been dancing his zombie song" Cecilia Thompson, a resident of Rehab community told this paper late Wednesday.

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