Ethiopia: Act Now to Tackle Planetary Crises

The virtual Fifth Session of the United Nations Environment Assembly ended recently with a clear message: our fragile planet needs more and it needs it now.

More action, more cooperation, more finance, more ambition and more sustained commitment to tackle environmental crisis and rebuild societies ravaged by the global pandemic.

At this unprecedented virtual session, 153 countries registered and connected online along with civil society and other stakeholders, showing the commitment of stakeholders to tackle pressing issues of environmental degradation even during the COVID-19 crisis.

Participants were left in no doubt those 2021 marks a critical turning point if the world wants to secure a future where people and planet can thrive together.

United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) Executive Director Inger Andersen described the cost of inaction in remarks to Tuesday's Leadership Dialogue.

"Unless we take action, future generations stand to inherit a hothouse planet with more carbon in the atmosphere than in 800,000 years. Unless we take action, future generations will live in sinking cities. From Basra to Lagos; from Mumbai to Houston unless we take action, future generations will be lucky if they can spot a black rhino.

And unless we take action, future generations will have to live with our toxic waste - which every year is enough to fill 125,000 Olympic size swimming pools," she said.

Indian environmental activist Afroz Shah, who has been honored by UNEP as a Champion of the Earth, told the delegates that the time for talking was over and that collaboration was needed to redress the planetary balance.

"The problem is our rights are weighing too heavy on the rights of the other species. This delicate balance will have to tilt in the favor of other species and that is the key" he said.

During two days of online meetings and presentations, many Member States expressed profound concern at the triple planetary crises of climate change, nature loss and pollution, noting that the COVID-19 pandemic had exacerbated existing problems and threatened efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

"We will face recurring risks of pandemics in the future if we maintain our current unsustainable patterns in our interactions with nature," said Sveinung Rotevatn, President of UNEA-5. "I believe we have discovered during this time of crisis just how much our health and wellbeing depends upon nature and the solutions that nature provides."

President Uhuru Kenyatta of Kenya, which hosts UNEP's headquarters in Nairobi, also spoke of the need to act swiftly.

"It is increasingly evident that environmental crises are part of the journey ahead. Wildfires, hurricanes, high temperature records, unprecedented winter chills, plagues of locusts, floods and droughts, have become so commonplace that they do not always make the headlines," he told the Assembly.

"These increasing adverse weather and climatic occurrences sound a warning bell that calls on us to attend to the three planetary crises that threaten our collective future: the climate crisis, the biodiversity and nature crisis, and the pollution and waste crisis."

The situation is dire but there are reasons to hope. Member States expressed support for a green post-pandemic recovery that leaves no one behind and also protects and renews the fragile natural world, with many noting that the health of nature and human health are inextricably linked, with the nature crisis also tied to the climate and pollution crises.

The green recovery should put the world on a pathway towards a low carbon, resilient and inclusive post-pandemic world. It should invest in the transition to a circular economy to achieve sustainable consumption and production and make full use of the role that nature-based solutions can offer to address climate change, nature loss and pollution.

Over two days, UNEA-5 saw a global effort on resource efficiency and the circular economy, recognition of the importance of financing and emissions reductions; and an exploration of big data as a tool for change.

Ahead of the Assembly, science and business leaders also gathered virtually for the UN Science-Policy-Business Forum to discuss the role of business in addressing the triple planetary crises.

Member States committed to work together and also outlined actions already taken nationally, such as efforts to protect mangroves, peat lands and forests or to tackle pollution and waste, including single use plastics. Representatives from youth groups addressed delegates, demanding action and a voice at the table.

The Assembly endorsed a final statement warning that "more than ever that human health and wellbeing are dependent upon nature and the solutions it provides, and we are aware that we shall face recurring risks of future pandemics if we maintain our current unsustainable patterns in our interactions with nature."

Despite the gravity of the challenges facing humanity and the planet, the meeting also heard messages of inspiration. "We have gathered here as ambassadors of hope and architects of a new paradigm and our work together and in harmony with nature will ensure our ultimate victory," Ghanaian musician and UNEP Regional Goodwill Ambassador Rocky Dawuni told delegates.

A roadmap to a better, more sustainable future was provided by UNEP's Making Peace with Nature report, which was launched by the UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres before the week. It shows clearly that the earth's environmental emergencies must be addressed together to achieve sustainability.

This means tackling the red thread that binds these emergencies together - unsustainable consumption and production. The report suggests concrete actions for different sectors - from governments to civil society to businesses - to address the planetary crisis.

UNEP will drive the radical change to an era of action. Delegates to UNEA-5 approved its Medium-Term Strategy 2022-25, programme of work and budget, enabling it to work harder for an end to unsustainable consumption and production.

"The strategy is about transforming how UNEP operates and engages with Member States, UN agencies, the private sector, civil society and youth groups, so we can go harder, faster, stronger," said UNEP's Andersen.

"This strategy is about providing science and know-how to governments. The strategy is also about collective, whole-of-society action - moving us outside ministries of environment to drive action."

UNEA-5 also marked the start of a period of reflection and celebration to mark the creation of UNEP 50 years ago.

The second part of UNEA-5 is scheduled to take place in February 2022 with hopes that delegates will be able to meet in person with a richer and fuller agenda.

Between now and then, the world needs to see enhanced ambitions on cutting greenhouse gases, a strong post-2020 framework for protecting our precious biodiversity and a commitment to managing chemicals and tackling plastic pollution.

This Assembly marked the start of a year of critical meetings on all these issues, with Member States gathering later this year, notably at UN Biodiversity Conference in Kunming, China, where nations will address species and ecosystem loss, and then at the UN Climate Conference, known as COP26, in Glasgow when countries are expected to come forward with more ambitious commitments on cutting greenhouse gas emissions.

As the UN Secretary-General said in his speech to UNEA-5, "To a large degree, the viability of humanity on this planet depends on your efforts. With leadership, determination and commitment to future generations, I am convinced we can provide a healthy planet for all humanity to not just survive, but to thrive."

UNEP's Inger Andersen concluded the Assembly with "The science is clear. We have to change our ways and we have to be sure that 2021 is that turning point."

COMPILED BY DIRRIBA TESHOME

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