Southern Africa: Communique On the Extraordinary SADC People's Summit On Mozambique

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1.Representatives from social movements and civic society organisations met on the 8th of April 2021 to shadow the Extraordinary SADC Double Troika Summit convened by SADC leaders to address the ongoing conflict in Mozambique.

2.The People's Summit received verified reports on the humanitarian, human rights and economic impacts of the conflict. Nearly 3 000 civilians have been reported dead and a further 700 000 civilians displaced. Over 1 million people are estimated to be in urgent need of humanitarian support.

3.The Summit condemned the disproportionate targeting of women and children as objects of sexual violence attributed to both the insurgents and State security.

4.The People's Summit expressed concern over the absence of a robust SADC intervention mechanism or process since the onset of the conflict in 2017.

5.Summit rejected the thesis that the ISIS, Al-Shabaab Mozambique or foreign militias are sorely responsible for the conflict and highlighted the combustive interplay between unresolved local grievances and the collusion of native elites and foreign cartels in stripping Cabo Delgado resources.

6.Summit noted the failure by the Mozambican government to guarantee security of civilians and address the humanitarian impacts of the conflict.

7.Summit highlighted the escalation of rights violations particularly the rape of young girls and women perpetrated by both the insurgents and State Security Forces.

8.Summit expressed concern over the growth of a regional cross-boundary illicit economy in drugs, minerals, human trafficking and small arms in the Region as a direct result of the conflict.

9.Summit received pledges of people-to-people solidarity from around the region aimed at mobilizing voices, resources and practical support to help the people of Mozambique.

Recommendations

1.Summit called for an end to military hostilities and removal of mercenary security companies, foreign insurgents and other destabilizing forces in the Cabo Delgado region.

2.Summit underscored, the need for an inclusive national dialogue process aimed at achieving lasting peace through resolving the root and underlying causes of the conflict in Northern Mozambique.

3.Summit urged SADC leaders to urgently deploy a high-level team of envoys to engage all stakeholders and inform a comprehensive SADC regional response to address the conflict.

4.Summit recommended the immediate declaration of a Humanitarian Emergency to facilitate the mobilization of necessary humanitarian interventions.

5.Summit urged SADC leaders, to prioritize the economic emancipation of the region through the reversal of harmful extractive contracts and debts arrangements.

6.Summit called upon SADC to strengthen and implement regionally binding frameworks to regulate the operations of extractive industries and ensure compliance with international human rights standards.

7.Summit called upon the Government of Mozambique to comprehensively address the historic marginalization of the Cabo Delgado Region through the devolution of power and authority from Maputo to the hinterlands.

8.Summit urged SADC leaders, to send a fact-finding mission to investigate and ascertain claims of massive human rights abuses particularly rape and sexual violence against women.

Summit committed to;

i.Leverage people to people solidarity and speak out against terrorism and the reluctance by SADC leaders to take robust action to address the conflict.

ii.Continuously engage SADC and Mozambican Embassies within different SADC countries on the situation in Cabo Delgado.

iii.Mobilise humanitarian goods and resources to support affected brothers and sisters from Mozambique.

Source: Crisis in Zimbabwe Coalition

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