South Africa: Trouble With the Sweet Stuff - Health Activists Step in to Educate People On How to Be 'Sugar Smart'

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In a bid to improve nutrition and reduce obesity in Boston, United States, health activists say people need to be 'sugar woke' and cut down on sugary drinks.

Concerned health activists in the American city of Boston have called for emergency awareness on the negative health effects of consuming too many sugary beverages.

This follows alarming reports of an increase in diet-related diseases including obesity and diabetes in Boston as a result of excess sugar in sugary beverages such as sodas, sports drinks, sweetened tea, coffee drinks and energy drinks.

By the end of 2019, Statista's consumer goods and fast-moving consumer goods statistics ranked the US as second out of 10 of the most populated countries in the world when it comes to consumption of carbonated soft drinks.

Studies in the prestigious science journal Nature have also suggested that diet-related diseases are connected to a risk of severe Covid-19. These studies emphasise that obesity and diabetes are important independent risk factors for severe Covid-19. They recommend that:

"Programmes resulting in weight loss and the improvement of metabolic health in people with metabolically unhealthy obesity should be implemented at the patient level and in the public health sector."

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