South Africa: SA's Murder Rate Continues Its Grisly Rise As Cops Report Drop in Other Crimes

analysis

There has been a decline in 'previously stubborn' crimes such as assault, sexual offences, common assault and robbery for the fourth quarter of 2020/21, but murders continue to show an increase from previous quarters, the latest crime statistics show.

A total of 4,976 people were murdered in the first three months of 2021 between 1 January to the end of March, according to the fourth-quarter crime statistics for the reporting period 2020/21.

"This is 387 more people killed compared to the corresponding period in the previous financial year," said the Police Minister Bheki Cele.

"The murder trend is worrying. One other thing we've noticed with murder is a form of 'one incident with multiple victims' in the Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal."

Speaking at a media briefing on Friday, 14 May, Cele said that when there are more victims in a single murder incident, policing becomes difficult.

The majority of the murders had occurred during arguments when people had gathered around social spaces, and during robberies (residential and non-residential), street robberies, mob justice and gang-related incidents.

The Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal recorded double-digit murder increases of 21.5% and 16.9% respectively.

Although Cele reported a 4% decline in rape cases compared with...

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