Angola: President Defends Close Relationship With African-Americans

President of Angola João Lourenço (file photo).

President defends close relationship with African-Americans Politics Luanda - The President of the Republic, João Lourenço, defended this Monday in Washington a close relationship between African countries and the African-American community. "The suffering that our brothers went through in the time of slavery touches us deeply. For this reason, we have to establish a closer relationship between our African countries and our diaspora, part of which is here in the United States of America," President Lourenço said after visiting the National Museum of African-American History and Culture. The Angolan president, who said he was surprised and moved by the museum's collection, said he had invited the Tucker family to visit Angola in the near future to share their experience with the National Archive, the universities and the Angolan communities. "Today it is this family, tomorrow it will be another, in order to maintain the link with their origins, with the African continent," he added. The Tucker family, who today spoke with President Lourenço at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, before the tour, is of African descent and lives in the state of Virginia. It holds the William Tucker 1624 Society, which conducts research on the life of William Tucker and his descendants. "As we realise the strength and resilience of the Africans who built and populated the United States of America, we document, preserve and share their narratives," the organisation's website reads. Museum The Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) addresses almost every aspect of the African American experience, encompassing the arts, slavery, the Civil Rights Movement, athletics and more. It has over 30,000 historical exhibits, including slavery shackles and objects from the Black Panthers Party and the coffin of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old boy brutally murdered in Mississippi in 1955, whose death was one of the catalysts for the Civil Rights movement and the end of segregation.

Luanda - The President of the Republic, João Lourenço, defended this Monday in Washington a close relationship between African countries and the African-American community.

"The suffering that our brothers went through in the time of slavery touches us deeply. For this reason, we have to establish a closer relationship between our African countries and our diaspora, part of which is here in the United States of America," President Lourenço said after visiting the National Museum of African-American History and Culture.

The Angolan president, who said he was surprised and moved by the museum's collection, said he had invited the Tucker family to visit Angola in the near future to share their experience with the National Archive, the universities and the Angolan communities.

"Today it is this family, tomorrow it will be another, in order to maintain the link with their origins, with the African continent," he added.

The Tucker family, who today spoke with President Lourenço at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, before the tour, is of African descent and lives in the state of Virginia.

It holds the William Tucker 1624 Society, which conducts research on the life of William Tucker and his descendants.

"As we realise the strength and resilience of the Africans who built and populated the United States of America, we document, preserve and share their narratives," the organisation's website reads.

Museum

The Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) addresses almost every aspect of the African American experience, encompassing the arts, slavery, the Civil Rights Movement, athletics and more.

It has over 30,000 historical exhibits, including slavery shackles and objects from the Black Panthers Party and the coffin of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old boy brutally murdered in Mississippi in 1955, whose death was one of the catalysts for the Civil Rights movement and the end of segregation.

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